Security News This Week: Yeah, About That Carrier Steaming Toward North Korea

Security News This Week: Yeah, About That Carrier Steaming Toward North Korea

Each weekend we round up the news stories that we didn’t break or cover in depth but that still deserve your attention. The post Security News This Week: Yeah, About That Carrier Steaming Toward North Korea appeared first on WIRED.

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The US Takes On the World in NATO’s Cyber War Games

The US Takes On the World in NATO’s Cyber War Games

Last year, the US finished last in Locked Shields, NATO’s cyber war games. This year, it had its eye on redemption. The post The US Takes On the World in NATO’s Cyber War Games appeared first on WIRED.

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A Big Change in NSA Spying Marks a Win for American Privacy

A Big Change in NSA Spying Marks a Win for American Privacy

The NSA won’t collect the emails of US citizens just because they mention a foreign target. That’s a big deal. The post A Big Change in NSA Spying Marks a Win for American Privacy appeared first on WIRED.

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Ultracold atom waves may shed light on rogue ocean killers

By precisely controlling the quantum behavior of an ultracold atomic gas, physicists have created a model system for studying the wave phenomenon that may bring about rogue waves in Earth’s oceans.

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Testosterone makes men less likely to question their impulses

Testosterone makes men less likely to realize when they’re wrong, a new study shows. The researchers found that men given doses of testosterone performed more poorly on a test designed to measure cognitive reflection than a group given a placebo.

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TRAPPIST-1 System Ideal For Life Swapping

A new study of the TRAPPIST-1 system indicates that life-swapping may take place between the planets in its habitable zone, and quite often too!
The post TRAPPIST-1 System Ideal For Life Swapping appeared first on Universe Today. …

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Fast, non-destructive test for two-dimensional materials

A fast, nondestructive optical method for analyzing defects in two-dimensional materials has been developed, with applications in electronics, sensing, early cancer diagnosis and water desalination.

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Pardon My Vomit: Zero G Ettiquette In the Age Of Space Tourism

With multiple commercial aerospace companies offering flights into space, to the Moon, and even beyond, would-be passengers are starting to train for the likelihood of “space sickness”.
The post Pardon My Vomit: Zero G Ettiquette In the Age Of Space Tourism appeared first on Universe Today. …

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Unexpected damage found rippling through promising exotic nanomaterials

Some of the most promising and puzzling phenomena in physics play out on the nanoscale, where a billionth-of-a-meter shift can make or break perfect electrical conductivity.

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Hubble’s bright shining lizard star

The bright object seen in this Hubble image is a single and little-studied star named TYC 3203-450-1, located in the constellation of Lacerta (The Lizard). The star is much closer than the much more distant galaxy. …

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Scientists set record resolution for drawing at the one-nanometer length scale

Using a specialized electron microscope outfitted with a pattern generator, scientists turned an imaging instrument into a lithography tool that could be used to create and study materials with new properties.

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New material inspired by a sea worm changes according to the environment

The gelatinous jaw of a sea worm, which becomes hard or flexible depending on the environment around it, has inspired researchers to develop a new material that can be applied to soft robotics. Despite having the texture of a gel, this compound is endowed with great mechanical resistance and consistency, and is able to adapt to changing environments.

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Study revises the development, evolutionary origin of the vertebrate brain

Researchers have made the first detailed map of the regions into which the brain of one of the most closely-related organisms to the vertebrates is divided and which could give us an idea of what our ancestor was like.

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Fast, low energy, and continuous biofuel extraction from microalgae

Researchers have used a nanosecond pulsed electric field to extract hydrocarbons from microalgae. By using the shorter duration pulse, they were able to extract a large amount of hydrocarbons from the microalgae in a shorter amount of time, using less energy, and in a more efficient manner than current methods. …

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Solar system: New insights into ring system

Astronomers have modeled the two rings around Chariklo, the smallest body in the Solar System known to have rings. This is the first time an entire ring system has been simulated using realistic sizes for the ring particles. The simulation revealed that the ring particles are much smaller than predicted or that an undiscovered shepherd satellite around Chariklo is stabilizing the ring. …

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The world’s fastest film camera: When light practically stands still

Forget high-speed cameras capturing 100,000 images per second. A research group has developed a camera that can film at a rate equivalent to five trillion images per second, or events as short as 0.2 trillionths of a second. This is faster than has previously been possible.

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Unlikely pair of plants named after stars of movie ‘twins’

Biologists have named an unlikely pair of plants after Arnold Schwarzenegger and Danny DeVito, the stars of the 1988 movie Twins. …

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Symbiotic bacteria: From hitchhiker to beetle bodyguard

Bacterial symbionts transition between plant pathogenicity and insect defensive mutualism, a new report demonstrates. The bacterium Burkholderia gladioli lives in specific organs of a plant-feeding beetle and defends the insect’s eggs from detrimental fungi by producing antibiotics. However, when transferred to a plant, the bacterium can spread throughout the tissues and negatively affect the plant.

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