1000 km range for e-cars thanks to a new battery concept

You cannot get far today with electric cars. One reason is that the batteries require a lot of space. Scientists are stacking large cells on top of one another. This provides vehicles with more power. Initial tests in the laboratory have been positive. In the medium term, the project partners are striving to achieve a range of 1,000 kilometers for electric vehicles.

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Climate instability over the past 720,000 years

A new analysis of an ice core from Dome Fuji in Antarctica, along with climate simulation results, shows a high degree of climate instability (that is, rapid climate fluctuations) within glacial periods with intermediate temperatures. This instability was attributed primarily to global cooling caused by a reduced greenhouse effect.

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Antarctic ice rift spreads

The rift in the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica now has a second branch, which is moving in the direction of the ice front, researchers revealed after studying the latest satellite data. The main rift in Larsen C, which is likely to lead to one of the largest icebergs ever recorded, is currently 180 km long. The new branch of the rift is 15 km long.

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Solar cells with nanostripes

Solar cells based on perovskites reach high efficiencies: they convert more than 20 percent of the incident light directly into usable power. On their search for underlying physical mechanisms, researchers have now detected strips of nanostructures with alternating directions of polarization in the perovskite layers. These structures might serve as transport paths for charge carriers.

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Antarctic Peninsula ice more stable than thought

Glacier flow at the southern Antarctic Peninsula has increased since the 1990s, but a new study has found the change to be only a third of what was recently reported.

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Cities provide paths from poverty to sustainability

Understanding how cities develop at the neighborhood level is key to promoting equitable, sustainable urbanization.

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Researchers develop radar simulator to characterize scattering of debris in tornadoes

Researchers have developed the first numerical polarimetric radar simulator to study and characterize the scattering of debris particles in tornadoes.

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Earth science: Rock samples indicate water is key ingredient for crust formation

By examining the cooling rate of rocks that formed more than 10 miles beneath the Earth’s surface, scientists have found that water probably penetrates deep into the crust and upper mantle at mid-ocean spreading zones, the places where new crust is made.

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Earthquakes can make thrust faults open violently and snap shut

Engineers and scientists experimentally observe surface twisting in thrust faults that can momentarily rip open the earth’s surface.

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Shunned by microbes, organic carbon can resist breakdown in underground environments

Organic matter whose breakdown would yield only minimal energy for hungry microorganisms preferentially builds up in floodplains, illuminating a new mechanism of carbon sequestration, a new study reveals.

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SimRadar: A polarimetric radar time-series simulator for tornadic debris studies

Scientists have developed the first numerical polarimetric radar simulator to study and characterize scattering mechanisms of debris particles in tornadoes. Characterizing the debris field of a tornado is vital given flying debris cause most tornado fatalities. Tornado debris characteristics are poorly understood even though the upgrade of the nation’s radar network to dual polarimetric radar offers potentially valuable capabilities for improving tornado warnings and nowcasting.

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Norway’s oldest ice found in central Norway

Parts of the ice of the Juvfonne snow patch in Jotunheimen are 7600 years old, which makes it the oldest dated ice on mainland Norway.

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Compact fiber optic apparatus shines light on breath analysis in real-time

An affordable gas sensor monitors trace levels of health-indicating chemicals, paving the way for future non-invasive studies, describe researchers in a new report.

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Researchers track impact of Brazil’s ‘Soy Moratorium’ on an advancing agricultural frontier

The 2006 Soy Moratorium had a larger effect in reducing deforestation in the Amazon than has been previously understood, outlines a new study.

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Discovery of a facile process for hydrogen production using ammonia as a carrier

Researchers have created a new process for producing hydrogen from ammonia with rapid initiation that requires no external heat source, giving hope for the increased global use of hydrogen as an efficient and clean energy source.

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When bridges collapse: Researchers study whether we’re underestimating risk

Studying how and why bridges have collapsed in the past identifies the limitation of current risk assessment approach and demonstrates the value of new perspectives on climate change impact.

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Long-term fate of tropical forests may not be as dire as believed, says study

Conventional wisdom has held that tropical forest growth will dramatically slow with high levels of rainfall. But researchers turned that assumption on its head with an unprecedented review of data from 150 forests that concluded just the opposite.

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Modern metabolic science yields better way to calculate indoor carbon dioxide

The air we breathe out can help us improve the quality of the air we breathe in. But to do so, one needs a reliable way to calculate the concentration of carbon dioxide we produce indoors. Researchers have developed a new computation method that uses well-established concepts from the study of human metabolism and exercise physiology to significantly improve how this important data is derived.

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Tibetan people have multiple adaptations for life at high altitudes

The Tibetan people have inherited variants of five different genes that help them live at high altitudes, with one gene originating in the extinct human subspecies, the Denisovans.

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Ice cave in Transylvania yields window into region’s past

Ice cores drilled from a glacier in a cave in Transylvania offer new evidence of how Europe’s winter weather and climate patterns fluctuated during the last 10,000 years, known as the Holocene period.

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Another good year for Chesapeake Bay’s underwater grasses

An annual survey shows the abundance of underwater grasses in Chesapeake Bay increased 8 percent between 2015 and 2016, continuing an upward trend initiated in 2012.

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Ocean warming to cancel increased carbon dioxide-driven productivity

Researchers have constructed a marine food web to show how climate change could affect our future fish supplies and marine biodiversity.

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Engineers shine light on deadly landslide

Late in the morning of March 22, 2014, a huge chunk of land cut loose and roared down a hillside in the Stillaguamish River Valley just east of Oso, Washington, about 60 miles northeast of Seattle. In a matter of minutes, 43 people lost their lives as a wall of mud, sand, clay, water. A new report details the factors leading to the disaster, the hazards that accompany landslides and steps that can be taken to mitigate landslide consequences and risk in the Pacific Northwest, with the aim of preventing future tragedies.

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Tsunami formation: Study challenges long-held theory

A new study is challenging a long-held theory that tsunamis form and acquire their energy mostly from vertical movement of the seafloor.

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Changes that lightning inspires in rock quantified

New research has identified the minimum temperature of a bolt of lightning as it strikes rock. The study discovered that, based on the crystalline material in the sample, the minimum temperature at which the fulgurite formed was roughly 1,700 degrees Celsius.

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Paleontologists identify new 507-million-year-old sea creature with can opener-like pincers

Paleontologists have uncovered a new fossil species that sheds light on the origin of mandibulates, the most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth, to which belong familiar animals such as flies, ants, crayfish and centipedes. Named Tokummia katalepsis by the researchers, the creature documents for the first time the anatomy of early mandibulates, a sub-group of arthropods with specialized appendages known as mandibles, used to grasp, crush and cut their food.

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Hard rocks from Himalaya raise flood risk for millions

Scientists have shown how earthquakes and storms in the Himalaya can increase the impact of deadly floods in one of Earth’s most densely populated areas.

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