‘The blob’ of abnormal conditions boosted Western US ozone levels

Ozone levels in June 2015 were significantly higher than normal over a large swath of the Western US. Analysis ties this air quality pattern to the abnormal conditions in the northeast Pacific Ocean, nicknamed ‘the blob.’

Read More...

Comments Off on ‘The blob’ of abnormal conditions boosted Western US ozone levels

Canadian glaciers now major contributor to sea level change, study shows

Ice loss from Canada’s Arctic glaciers has transformed them into a major contributor to sea level change, new research has found. From 2005 to 2015, surface melt off ice caps and glaciers of the Queen Elizabeth Islands grew by an astonishing 900 percent.

Read More...

Comments Off on Canadian glaciers now major contributor to sea level change, study shows

Beach bashing: Last year’s El Niño resulted in unprecedented erosion of Pacific coastline

Last winter’s El Niño might have felt weak to residents of Southern California, but it was in fact one of the most powerful climate events of the past 145 years. If such severe El Niño events become more common in the future as some studies suggest they might, the California coast — home to more than 25 million people — may become increasingly vulnerable to coastal hazards. And that’s independent of projected sea level rise.

Read More...

Comments Off on Beach bashing: Last year’s El Niño resulted in unprecedented erosion of Pacific coastline

Ventura fault could cause stronger shaking, new research finds

The fault under Ventura, California, would likely cause stronger shaking during an earthquake and more damage than previously suspected, researchers warn. The Ventura-Pitas Point fault in Southern California has been the focus of much recent attention because it is thought to be capable of magnitude 8 earthquakes. It underlies the city of Ventura and runs offshore, and thus could generate tsunamis.

Read More...

Comments Off on Ventura fault could cause stronger shaking, new research finds

Important to maintain a diversity of habitats in the sea

Both species diversity and habitat diversity are critical to understand the functioning of ecosystems, scientists have concluded in a new report.

Read More...

Comments Off on Important to maintain a diversity of habitats in the sea

Reactive lignin for reducing the environmental impacts of wood products

Technology known as “CatLignin” has been created to produce reactive lignin from pulp industry side streams to be used as a replacement for toxic phenol compounds in wood adhesives that are widely used in wood products and furniture.

Read More...

Comments Off on Reactive lignin for reducing the environmental impacts of wood products

Diehard Coders Just Rescued NASA’s Earth Science Data | WIRED

Hackers are building up robust systems to monitor changes to government websites. And they’re keeping track of data that’s already been removed. ON SATURDAY MORNING, the white stone buildings on UC Berkeley’s campus radiated with unfiltered sunshine. The sky was blue, the campanile was chiming. But instead of enjoying the beautiful day, 200 adults had willingly sardined themselves into a fluorescent-lit room in the bowels of Doe Library to rescue…

Read More…

Using high-resolution satellites to measure African farm yields

By using high-res images taken by the latest generation of compact satellites, scientists have developed a new capability for estimating crop yields from space.

Read More...

Comments Off on Using high-resolution satellites to measure African farm yields

New species of marine worm discovered in Antarctica

A team of scientists has discovered a new species of polychaete, a type of marine annelid worm, 9-meters deep underwater near Japan’s Syowa Station in Antarctica, providing a good opportunity to study how animals adapt to extreme environments.

Read More...

Comments Off on New species of marine worm discovered in Antarctica

Banned chemicals from the ’70s found in the deepest reaches of the ocean

Crustaceans from the deepest ocean trenches found to contain ten times the level of industrial pollution than the average earthworm, scientists have shown.

Read More...

Comments Off on Banned chemicals from the ’70s found in the deepest reaches of the ocean

How to be a successful pest: Lessons from the green peach aphid

Scientists have discovered why the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) is one of the most destructive pests to many of our most important crops. Their research will inform industry and research programs to support pest control and aid global food security.

Read More...

Comments Off on How to be a successful pest: Lessons from the green peach aphid

New study helps explain how garbage patches form in the world’s oceans

A new study on how ocean currents transport floating marine debris is helping to explain how garbage patches form in the world’s oceans. Researchers developed a mathematical model that simulates the motion of small spherical objects floating at the ocean surface.

Read More...

Comments Off on New study helps explain how garbage patches form in the world’s oceans

New theory explains how Earth’s inner core remains solid despite extreme heat

Even though it is hotter than the surface of the Sun, the crystallized iron core of the Earth remains solid. A new study may finally settle a longstanding debate over how that’s possible, as well as why seismic waves travel at higher speeds between the planet’s poles than through the equator.

Read More...

Comments Off on New theory explains how Earth’s inner core remains solid despite extreme heat

Scientists uncover huge 1.8 million square kilometers reservoir of melting carbon under Western United States

New research describes how scientists have used the world’s largest array of seismic sensors to map a deep-Earth area of melting carbon covering 1.8 million square kilometers. Situated under the Western US, 350km beneath Earth’s surface, the discovered melting region challenges accepted understanding of how much carbon Earth contains — much more than previously understood. 

Read More...

Comments Off on Scientists uncover huge 1.8 million square kilometers reservoir of melting carbon under Western United States

New data from NOAA GOES-16’s Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS) instrument

The new Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS) instrument onboard NOAA’s GOES-16 is working and successfully sending data back to Earth.

Read More...

Comments Off on New data from NOAA GOES-16’s Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS) instrument

50+ Year-Old Protein Volume Paradox Resolved

New research makes it possible to predict how volume for a given protein will change between the folded and unfolded state. Computations accurately predict how a protein will react to increased pressure, shed light on the inner-workings of life in the ocean depths, and may also offer insights into alien life.

Read More...

Comments Off on 50+ Year-Old Protein Volume Paradox Resolved

How behavioral science can help tackle problem of idling engines

New research suggests that insights from behavioral science can help inform the design of road signs to bring about changes in driver behavior.

Read More...

Comments Off on How behavioral science can help tackle problem of idling engines

Litter levels in the depths of the Arctic are on the rise

The Arctic has a serious litter problem: in just 10 years, the concentration of marine litter at a deep-sea station in the Arctic Ocean has risen 20-fold, according to researchers.

Read More...

Comments Off on Litter levels in the depths of the Arctic are on the rise

Chinese air pollution linked to respiratory and cardiovascular deaths

In the largest epidemiological study conducted in the developing world, researchers found that as exposures to fine particulate air pollution in 272 Chinese cities increase, so do deaths from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases.

Read More...

Comments Off on Chinese air pollution linked to respiratory and cardiovascular deaths

New details of Greenland ice loss revealed

Less than a year after the first research flight kicked off NASA’s Oceans Melting Greenland campaign, data from the new program are providing a dramatic increase in knowledge of how Greenland’s ice sheet is melting from below.

Read More...

Comments Off on New details of Greenland ice loss revealed

Gas hydrate breakdown unlikely to cause massive greenhouse gas release

A recent interpretive review of scientific literature sheds light on the interactions of gas hydrates and climate.

Read More...

Comments Off on Gas hydrate breakdown unlikely to cause massive greenhouse gas release

Fossil record should help guide conservation in a changing world

A group of biologists, paleobiologists, lawyers, policymakers and writers is urging conservationists not only to save species, but also to preserve a diverse array of ecosystem structures and functions in the face of rising populations and changing climate. This could include allowing some species to disappear from some areas if that means a more resilient environment able to respond to warming temperatures and habitat loss, according to researchers.

Read More...

Comments Off on Fossil record should help guide conservation in a changing world

Subsea mining moves closer to shore

Mining in the deep sea is technically very challenging and at present not economically feasible. However, deposits in coastal areas beneath the shallow, more accessible continental shelf could help to meet the growing demand for mineral resources, conclude researchers.

Read More...

Comments Off on Subsea mining moves closer to shore

Ancient Earth as a model for studying hazy exoplanets

For astronomers trying to understand which distant planets might have habitable conditions, the role of atmospheric haze has been hazy. To help sort it out, a team of researchers has been looking to Earth – specifically Earth during the Archean era, an epic 1-1/2-billion-year period early in our planet’s history.

Read More...

Comments Off on Ancient Earth as a model for studying hazy exoplanets

Long-term impacts of deep-sea mineral mining

Deep-sea nodule mining will cause long-lasting damage to deep-sea life. This study was the first to review all the available information on the impacts of small-scale sea-floor disturbances simulating mining activity. It found clear impacts on marine ecosystems from deep-sea nodule mining activities, which lasted at least for decades.

Read More...

Comments Off on Long-term impacts of deep-sea mineral mining

Why the ocean has absorbed more carbon over the past decade

With the ocean absorbing more carbon dioxide over the past decade, less of the greenhouse gas is reaching the Earth’s atmosphere. That’s decidedly good news, but it comes with a catch: Rising levels of carbon dioxide in the ocean promote acidification, which breaks down the calcium carbonate shells of some marine organisms.

Read More...

Comments Off on Why the ocean has absorbed more carbon over the past decade

Researchers invent a breakthrough process to produce renewable car tires from trees and grasses

A team of researchers has invented a new technology to produce automobile tires from trees and grasses in a process that could shift the tire production industry toward using renewable resources found right in our backyards.

Read More...

Comments Off on Researchers invent a breakthrough process to produce renewable car tires from trees and grasses