Our Strength Lies in Our Humanity

Everything is Connected

There are times in our lives when it’s easy to forget how connected everything is. Times when life gets a little too tough and stressful and we end up paying more attention to our own well being in a way that disregards the cost and the consequences to the world out there; the people, the environment and everything else that’s a part of it. We find ourselves being selfish – not because we want to be but because circumstances force us to be.

That’s how the world got into the state that it’s in now. Here’s a neat 20 minute video that explains it all.

On this website I’ll be exploring and adding videos and articles that help to expand and explain the rich and diverse complexity of the world we live in – complex but not complicated.


Latest News

Can AI Rescue Modern Medicine From Itself?

Can AI Rescue Modern Medicine From Itself? Labor unions have been around since the mid-19th century, and they’ve helped many a teacher, government employee, electrical worker, and others gain fairer pay or better working conditions. Unions give workers a chance to dictate their own terms and present a united front, ideally leaving everyone better off…

The mysterious ‘Tully Monster’ fossil just got more mysterious

The mysterious ‘Tully Monster’ fossil just got more mysterious Artist's impression of _Tullimonstrum_. PaleoEquii/Wikipedia, CC BY-SA Every now and again, scientists discover fossils that are so bizarre they defy classification, their body plans unlike any other living animals or plants. Tullimonstrum (also known as the Tully Monster), a 300m-year-old fossil discovered in the Mazon Creek…

Drug experts on the new guidance for medicinal cannabis

Drug experts on the new guidance for medicinal cannabis shutterstock/Canna Obscura It’s now one year since the government announced they would allow access to cannabis-based products for medicinal use, and guidelines advising doctors how to prescribe have now been published. Opening up access to medicinal cannabis was welcomed by many as a bold policy move,…

Why Designing Our Own Biology Will Be the Next Big Thing in Medicine

Why Designing Our Own Biology Will Be the Next Big Thing in Medicine It’s hard to watch a loved one get sick. Their eyes go glassy. Their breathing is punctuated by body-wracking coughs. Feverish and aching, they struggle to get out of bed. Hard as these symptoms are to witness, they’re so familiar you don’t…

Myths about only children debunked

Myths about only children debunked YanLev/Shutterstock Only children get a bad rap. They are often perceived as selfish, spoiled, anxious, socially inept and lonely. And my profession, psychology, may be partly to blame for these negative stereotypes. Indeed, Granville Stanley Hall, one of the most influential psychologists of the last century and the first president of the American Psychological Association, said that “being an only child is a disease in…

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How to see stars and tackle light pollution in your own backyard

How to see stars and tackle light pollution in your own backyard AstroStar/Shutterstock The dark skies of the great outdoors help people to see the wonders of space, either with the naked eye or using telescopes. That’s why observatories are usually placed in high altitudes or remote locations, where there’s often outstanding natural beauty and little light pollution. A report commissioned by the UK government recommended that every school child…

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Millions of malnourished children in West and Central Africa have been overlooked by UN estimates – new data

Millions of malnourished children in West and Central Africa have been overlooked by UN estimates – new data Children who experience multiple forms of malnutrition are at the greatest risk of early death. JLwarehouse/Shutterstock Four years ago the United Nations (UN) members states created a list of international development targets, known as the Sustainable Development Goals. These included 17 urgent calls for action aimed at improving the lives of people…

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Helena Gleichen: pioneer radiographer, suffragist and forgotten hero of World War I

Helena Gleichen: pioneer radiographer, suffragist and forgotten hero of World War I Gleichen sacrificed her own well-being to help save the lives of injured soldiers on the Italian Front. Douglas Olivares/ Shutterstock “Women, your country needs you,” Millicent Fawcett, the campaigner for women’s suffrage, proclaimed when war was declared in August 1914. One enthusiastic respondent to the call was Helena Gleichen, a rich aristocrat and a cousin of George V…

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NASA TV Coverage Set for Complex Spacewalks, Briefings

[rNASA TV Coverage Set for Complex Spacewalks, Briefings Two astronauts will venture outside the International Space Station for a series of complex spacewalks this month and next to repair the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), a cosmic ray detector. Source: NASA Breaking news http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-tv-coverage-set-for-complex-spacewalks-briefings

What is a psychopath?

What is a psychopath? Can you feel what I'm feeling? Andrey Popov/Shutterstock Millions recently flocked to the cinema to watch Joker, the origin story of Batman’s notorious nemesis. Many have commented that the film is a portrait of a textbook psychopath. But perhaps the bigger question is how many among the audience have similar traits? Indeed, is it possible that you are a psychopath yourself? To answer this question, we…

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Stabilising the global population is not a solution to the climate emergency – but we should do it anyway

Stabilising the global population is not a solution to the climate emergency – but we should do it anyway Global population is rising. Volodymyr Goinyk/Shutterstock A global coalition of 11,000 scientists has come up with a plan for dealing with the climate emergency. Most of these are things scientists have been saying for a while: decarbonise the economy, eliminate pollutants, restore ecosystems and reforest, and reduce meat consumption. However, the…

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Belgium’s first wolf in 100 years is presumed dead – have hopes of coexistence died with her?

Belgium’s first wolf in 100 years is presumed dead – have hopes of coexistence died with her? Naya was a mother to the first Belgian-born cubs in over a century. All are now thought to be dead. Bildagentur Zoonar GmbH/Shutterstock When Naya arrived in Belgium in January 2018, she was the first wolf to be tracked in the country for at least 100 years. She’d been followed with a radio…

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Why Medicine Needs a New Hippocratic Oath—and What It Should Be

Why Medicine Needs a New Hippocratic Oath—and What It Should Be Somewhere along the road from sickness to health, the American medical system took a wrong turn—a big one. The cost of care in our country is sky-high, yet our population health outcomes tend to be worse than those of other developed countries (many of which have universal health care). Major surgeries, treatments for long-term illnesses like cancer, and medical attention for catastrophic injuries are so expensive that people can lose their homes or be forced to declare bankruptcy. Even a routine visit to a general practitioner can cost hundreds of dollars. Yet Americans have some of the highest rates of heart disease, diabetes, and obesity in the world. How did we get here? In a talk at Singularity University’s…

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Origins of life: new evidence first cells could have formed at the bottom of the ocean

Origins of life: new evidence first cells could have formed at the bottom of the ocean Deep ocean hydrothermal vent – where life started? IFE / URI-IAO / UW / Lost City Science Party / NOAA / OAR / OER Where did life come from? In recent years, many scientists have shifted from favouring a “primordial soup” in pools of water to hydrothermal vents deep in the ocean as the original source of life on Earth. But one of the biggest problems with this idea is that researchers have been unable to recreate in the lab one of the key processes that would have been involved if this theory was true. Specifically, they haven’t been able to form simple cell membranes in seawater-like conditions, which most agree would have been…

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Why we need a better understanding of how PTSD affects families

Why we need a better understanding of how PTSD affects families Shutterstock/fizkes What’s the first thing that comes to mind when you hear the term “post-traumatic stress disorder”? When I ask this question in public presentations, the answers are along the lines of “the military”, “soldiers” and “war”. Then, when my next slide displays military themed images, it seems as if I have ingeniously predicted the audience’s response. That fact that people typically associate post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with war presents a significant problem. Because, while public awareness around PTSD and trauma exposure is increasing, the information people have may be inaccurate or incomplete. And this risks the disorder, and those who are living with it, being misrepresented and misunderstood. As the full description spells out, PTSD is a psychological…

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On the way to intelligent microrobots

On the way to intelligent microrobots Zurich, Switzerland (SPX) Nov 07, 2019 Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and ETH Zurich have developed a micromachine that can perform different actions. First nanomagnets in the components of the microrobots are magnetically programmed and then the various movements are controlled by magnetic fields. Such machines, which are only a few tens of micrometres across, could be used, for example, in the human body to perform Source: NanoDaily.com http://www.robodaily.com/reports/On_the_way_to_intelligent_microrobots_999.html

How hypothetical designs can help us think through our conversations about euthanasia

How hypothetical designs can help us think through our conversations about euthanasia Speculative design highlights many of the questions we still need to ask when it comes to euthanasia. Photographee.eu/Shutterstock Belgian Paralympic athlete Marieke Vervoort revealed two years ago that in 2008, she had been approved to receive euthanasia. The Paralympian was an accomplished wheelchair racer, having won gold and silver at the London 2012 Paralympics, and silver and bronze at the 2016 Rio Games. However, she suffered from an incurable degenerative muscle disease that caused constant pain, seizures, and in Vervoort’s case, paralysis in her legs. In October 2019, Vervoort made the decision to end her life through euthanasia at the age of 40. Euthanasia remains a controversial medical procedure. Euthanasia is when a person makes a conscious decision…

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