Our Strength Lies in Our Humanity

Everything is Connected

There are times in our lives when it’s easy to forget how connected everything is. Times when life gets a little too tough and stressful and we end up paying more attention to our own well being in a way that disregards the cost and the consequences to the world out there; the people, the environment and everything else that’s a part of it. We find ourselves being selfish – not because we want to be but because circumstances force us to be.

That’s how the world got into the state that it’s in now. Here’s a neat 20 minute video that explains it all.

On this website I’ll be exploring and adding videos and articles that help to expand and explain the rich and diverse complexity of the world we live in – complex but not complicated.

Latest News

Greta Thunberg’s voice speaks just as loud as her words

Greta Thunberg’s voice speaks just as loud as her words “Do you think they hear us? We’ll make them hear us!”. This was the rallying call Greta Thunberg gave to 250,000 people in New York’s packed streets, and millions worldwide who were taking part in the largest climate protest in history. In political chambers and…

NASA Television to Broadcast Next Space Station Crew Launch, Docking

[rNASA Television to Broadcast Next Space Station Crew Launch, Docking A multinational crew, including NASA astronaut Jessica Meir and the first space traveler from the United Arab Emirates (UAE), is scheduled to launch to the International Space Station Wednesday, Sept. 25. NASA Television and the agency’s website will provide live coverage of the crew’s launch…

NASA, Australian Space Agency to Sign Joint Statement at NASA Headquarters

[rNASA, Australian Space Agency to Sign Joint Statement at NASA Headquarters Media are invited to a joint signing ceremony between NASA and the Australian Space Agency at 9 a.m. EDT Saturday, Sept. 21, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Source: NASA Breaking news http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-australian-space-agency-to-sign-joint-statement-at-nasa-headquarters

Toxoplasma ‘cat poo’ parasite infects billions – so why is it so hard to study?

Toxoplasma ‘cat poo’ parasite infects billions – so why is it so hard to study? New Africa/Shutterstock What if I told you that there is a good chance you are carrying a parasite that is transmitted through cat poo? Two billion people around the world carry Toxoplasma gondii so there may be more than a…

Drug use in England and Wales is up for the fourth year in a row

Drug use in England and Wales is up for the fourth year in a row Cocaine is the third most commonly used drug among people aged 16 to 24. Christopher Elwell/Shutterstock Once a year we get a glimpse of how many people are using drugs such as heroin and cocaine in England and Wales. The Home Office conducts an annual household survey that asks people if they have used drugs…

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Why is climate change still not top of the news agenda?

Why is climate change still not top of the news agenda? Big news. Zerbor via Shutterstock Climate breakdown threatens the lives of us all. Scientific research has suggested that we are in the process of a “mass extinction” event that could lead to “biological annihilation” on a large scale. Records indicate that population decay and the rapid extinction of a large number of vertebrates in recent years amount to “a…

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How a Centuries-Old Sculpting Method Is Helping 3D Print Organs With Blood Vessels

How a Centuries-Old Sculpting Method Is Helping 3D Print Organs With Blood Vessels Blood vessels are the lifeline of any organ. The dense web of channels, spread across tissues like a spider web, allow oxygen and nutrients to reach the deepest cores of our hearts, brains, and lungs. Without a viable blood supply, tissues rot from the inside. For any attempt at 3D printing viable organs, scientists have to tackle…

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What does a healthy diet look like for me and the planet? It depends where you live

What does a healthy diet look like for me and the planet? It depends where you live Africa Studio/Shutterstock I want people to think about the food that they eat not just from “field to fork” but from “seed to soul”. I’ve studied how to make the world’s food supply sustainable for more than 30 years, so people often ask me what’s the best diet for the planet. The problem…

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Sail GP: how do supercharged racing yachts go so fast? An engineer explains

Sail GP: how do supercharged racing yachts go so fast? An engineer explains Sailing used to be considered as a rather sedate pastime. But in the past few years, the world of yacht racing has been revolutionised by the arrival of hydrofoil-supported catamarans, known as “foilers”. These vessels, more akin to high-performance aircraft than yachts, combine the laws of aerodynamics and hydrodynamics to create vessels capable of speeds of up…

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NASA Awards $2.3 Million in Fellowships to US Universities for Aviation, Planetary, Space Research

[rNASA Awards $2.3 Million in Fellowships to US Universities for Aviation, Planetary, Space Research NASA has awarded fellowships to 14 minority-serving institutions through its Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP) and five majority institutions through its Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), all totaling $2.3 million, to support graduate student research. Source: NASA Breaking news http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-awards-23-million-in-fellowships-to-us-universities-for-aviation-planetary-space

How we discovered that an asteroid collision in space 466m years ago boosted life on Earth

How we discovered that an asteroid collision in space 466m years ago boosted life on Earth Trilobites evolved following the massive collision. Birger Schmidtz Something mysterious happened nearly half a billion years ago that triggered one of the most important changes in the history of life on Earth. Suddenly, there was an explosion of species, with the biodiversity of invertebrate animals increasing from a very low level to something similar…

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5 Areas We Should Invest in Now to Survive Climate Change Later

5 Areas We Should Invest in Now to Survive Climate Change Later Even if the world manages to keep to the Paris Agreement goal of limiting global mean temperatures to 2°C above pre-industrial levels, climate change is coming. The best way to protect ourselves from its effects is to drastically cut our emissions by deploying renewables, electrification, and energy-efficiency measures. But we’ll also need to adapt to the changes that…

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Five things every government needs to do right now to tackle the climate emergency

Five things every government needs to do right now to tackle the climate emergency Are governments listening? Karl Nesh/Shutterstock? If targets were enough to beat the climate crisis, we would have cause for celebration. The UK, Norway, Sweden and France have written a target of net-zero emissions into law, and 15 others are considering similar legislation or have non-binding targets. Hundreds of cities, regions and individual companies have made similar pledges. Arguments are raging about whether these targets are good enough. Close reading of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s reports suggests that developed countries need to reach net zero within ten to 15 years if they are to give developing countries some leeway. That’s long before the date most countries have committed to. Yet this row masks a more…

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Ritalin at 75: what does the future hold?

Ritalin at 75: what does the future hold? Wikipedia, CC BY-SA Seventy-five years ago, a new stimulant drug with the generic name of methylphenidate was born in the Swiss lab of chemical company Ciba. Like many drugs, its therapeutic purpose was unclear. But these were the days a scientist could take a drug home and test it on their spouse, which is exactly what Ciba scientist Leandro Panizzon did. Panizzon’s wife, Rita, reported that the drug gave her tennis game a real fillip. And so Panizzon named the drug Ritaline in his wife’s honour. Panizzon would not have been surprised by this. Stimulants, including amphetamines, such as Benzedrine, had been used since the 1930s for a variety of afflictions, including psychiatric disorders. During World War II, they were widely prescribed…

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#ShowYourStripes: how climate data became a cultural icon

#ShowYourStripes: how climate data became a cultural icon Enter Shikari put climate change centre stage at Reading Festival 2019. University of Reading, Author provided It seems that people are finally waking up to the threat of climate change. The most poignant sign of this for me was seeing an infographic I created adorning the main music stage at Reading Festival 2019. While the majority of those in the crowd may not have grasped its true meaning, or been in the frame of mind to understand it, it was a significant moment. A popular rock band publicly endorsed climate research and literally put it centre stage. The climate stripes illustrate the global average temperature for every year since 1850 in the form of a coloured stripe. Shades of blue represent cooler…

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Hurricane Dorian was also a catastrophe for the Bahamas’ unique birds

Hurricane Dorian was also a catastrophe for the Bahamas’ unique birds Scientists are worried about the Abaco, a subspecies of parrot found found only in the Bahamas. Henner Damke / Shutterstock Hurricane Dorian was the second most powerful Atlantic hurricane on record and the fifth to reach the highest hurricane category (five) in the past four years. After it first made landfall, it hovered over the northern Bahamas for more than 50 hours. The human death toll is currently around 50 but more than 1,000 people are still missing and at least 70,000 have been left homeless. Many residents have lost everything, including their tourism industry, and are in desperate need of humanitarian assistance. At a time of such immense human tragedy, it may seem too soon to mourn the…

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Over 3,000 killed by deadly virus in Democratic Republic of the Congo this year – and it’s not Ebola

Over 3,000 killed by deadly virus in Democratic Republic of the Congo this year – and it’s not Ebola Ebola outbreaks, such as the current one in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), which has claimed 2,074 people’s lives, are widely covered in the media. But another virus is ravaging the DRC with minimal publicity. That virus is measles. Although measles has a much lower mortality rate than Ebola (around 2% compared with around 60%), there have been over 165,000 suspected cases of measles, with over 3,200 deaths in the DRC since the start of 2019. In a recent speech, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of the World Health Organisation (WHO), said that he was “embarrassed to talk only about Ebola” in response to questions on recent developments in the…

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