Our Strength Lies in Our Humanity

Everything is Connected

There are times in our lives when it’s easy to forget how connected everything is. Times when life gets a little too tough and stressful and we end up paying more attention to our own well being in a way that disregards the cost and the consequences to the world out there; the people, the environment and everything else that’s a part of it. We find ourselves being selfish – not because we want to be but because circumstances force us to be.

That’s how the world got into the state that it’s in now. Here’s a neat 20 minute video that explains it all.

On this website I’ll be exploring and adding videos and articles that help to expand and explain the rich and diverse complexity of the world we live in – complex but not complicated.

Latest News

NASA Television to Air Russian Spacewalk at International Space Station

[rNASA Television to Air Russian Spacewalk at International Space Station Two veteran Russian cosmonauts will venture outside the International Space Station for a spacewalk Wednesday, May 29, to retrieve science experiments and conduct maintenance on the orbiting laboratory. Source: Eurogamer. http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-television-to-air-russian-spacewalk-at-international-space-station-0

Recycling: poorer countries can now refuse plastic waste imports – this could make the system fairer

Recycling: poorer countries can now refuse plastic waste imports – this could make the system fairer The world generated 242 million tonnes of plastic waste in 2016 – a figure that’s expected to grow by 70% in the next 30 years. But this same plastic is also a commodity that’s sold and traded in a…

Withdrawing life support: only one person’s view matters

Withdrawing life support: only one person’s view matters Shortly before Frenchman Vincent Lambert’s life support was due to be removed, doctors at Sebastopol Hospital in Reims, France, were ordered to stop. An appeal court ruled that life support must continue. Lambert was seriously injured in a motorcycle accident in 2008 and has been diagnosed as…

Climate change: ‘We’ve created a civilisation hell bent on destroying itself – I’m terrified’, writes Earth scientist

Climate change: ‘We’ve created a civilisation hell bent on destroying itself – I’m terrified’, writes Earth scientist shutterstock The coffee tasted bad. Acrid and with a sweet, sickly smell. The sort of coffee that results from overfilling the filter machine and then leaving the brew to stew on the hot plate for several hours. The…

Camel milk reduces cell inflammation associated with type 2 diabetes

Camel milk reduces cell inflammation associated with type 2 diabetes Camel milk is mainly consumed in the Middle East and parts of Africa but has become fashionable in the West in recent years. Africa Studio/Shutterstock The current trend for certain foods and dietary components to be called “superfoods” is frequently associated with exotic and expensive products. But there are no set criteria to determine a food’s “superness” – and claims…

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The reality of caring for someone with dementia – stressful but rewarding too

The reality of caring for someone with dementia – stressful but rewarding too Pexels Dementia is set to become one of the biggest global health challenges of our generation. In the UK alone there are around 850,000 people living with the disease and this figure is projected to more than double by 2051. Those of us who don’t develop dementia will probably end up caring for someone who does. According…

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Why a patient may need a companion to speak for them – and the difficult choices they face

Why a patient may need a companion to speak for them – and the difficult choices they face When a person whose communication is affected by a developmental disability (like Down syndrome or autism) needs to speak with a doctor, they often have to rely on a companion to help them. Whether it’s a family member, a friend, or a professional support worker, that companion has to gauge very carefully…

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More and more women are freezing their eggs – but only 21% of those who use them have become mothers

More and more women are freezing their eggs – but only 21% of those who use them have become mothers In vitro fertilisation. vchal/Shutterstock As the trend for older motherhood continues, amid warnings from experts about the sharp decline in a woman’s fertility in her mid-30s, more and more women are considering egg freezing as a form of “insurance” against age-related infertility. Recent figures released by the Human Fertilisation and…

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NASA Administrator to Make Artemis Moon Program Announcement, Media Teleconference Set

[rNASA Administrator to Make Artemis Moon Program Announcement, Media Teleconference Set NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine will make a significant announcement about the Artemis program’s lunar exploration plans at 1 p.m. EDT Thursday, May 23, at the Florida Institute of Technology. The remarks will be carried live on NASA Television and the agency’s website. Source: Eurogamer. http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-administrator-to-make-artemis-moon-program-announcement-media-teleconference-set

NASA Astrobiology Researchers Identify Features That Could Be Used to Detect Life-Friendly Climates on Other Worlds

NASA Astrobiology Researchers Identify Features That Could Be Used to Detect Life-Friendly Climates on Other Worlds Scientists may have found a way to tell if alien worlds have a climate that is suitable for life by analyzing the light from these worlds for special signatures that are characteristic of a life-friendly environment. Source: Nasa Solar System and Beyond News http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/goddard/2019/m-star-habitability

Complex life may only exist because of millions of years of groundwork by ancient fungi

Complex life may only exist because of millions of years of groundwork by ancient fungi PinkBlue/Shutterstock Because of their delicate organic and decomposing nature, fossilised fungi are extremely rare. So rare, in fact, that a new discovery has just pushed back the earliest evidence of fungi by at least 500m years – doubling their age. Until now, the oldest confirmed fungal fossils dated to around 450m years ago – about…

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How we traced ‘mystery emissions’ of CFCs back to eastern China

How we traced ‘mystery emissions’ of CFCs back to eastern China Since being universally ratified in the 1980s, the Montreal Protocol – the treaty charged with healing the ozone layer – has been wildly successful in causing large reductions in emissions of ozone depleting substances. Along the way, it has also averted a sizeable amount of global warming, as those same substances are also potent greenhouse gases. No wonder the…

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This robot helps you lift objects — by looking at your biceps

Lead author Joseph DelPreto demonstrates the system’s ability to mirror his movements by monitoring muscle activity.

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Zero-carbon electric transport is already in reach for small islands

Zero-carbon electric transport is already in reach for small islands Electric cars charging on Hainan Island, China. Evgenii mitroshin/Shutterstock At a recent talk on the UK’s energy sector, the head of an electric utility company claimed that “the problem of decarbonising our electricity sector is fixed”. Eyebrows were raised at this, but his point quickly became clear. The technologies needed to decarbonise the UK’s electricity system now exist, he explained. Indeed, grid operators in the UK expect a zero carbon electricity system by 2025. But far greater challenges remain in the heat and transport sectors. Electrifying road transport will likely take longer than 2025 and more electric vehicles could cause the grid’s current electricity demand to double. This is where small island states could help. They provide the perfect proving…

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Zero-carbon electric transport is already in reach for small islands

Zero-carbon electric transport is already in reach for small islands Electric cars charging on Hainan Island, China. Evgenii mitroshin/Shutterstock At a recent talk on the UK’s energy sector, the head of an electric utility company claimed that “the problem of decarbonising our electricity sector is fixed”. Eyebrows were raised at this, but his point quickly became clear. The technologies needed to decarbonise the UK’s electricity system now exist, he explained. Indeed, grid operators in the UK expect a zero carbon electricity system by 2025. But far greater challenges remain in the heat and transport sectors. Electrifying road transport will likely take longer than 2025 and more electric vehicles could cause the grid’s current electricity demand to double. This is where small island states could help. They provide the perfect proving…

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Revolt on the horizon? How young people really feel about digital technology

Revolt on the horizon? How young people really feel about digital technology DisobeyAr/Shutterstock As digital technologies facilitate the growth of both new and incumbent organisations, we have started to see the darker sides of the digital economy unravel. In recent years, many unethical business practices have been exposed, including the capture and use of consumers’ data, anticompetitive activities and covert social experiments. But what do young people who grew up with the internet think about this development? Our research with 400 digital natives – 19- to 24-year-olds – shows that this generation, dubbed “GenTech”, may be the one to turn the digital revolution on its head. Our findings point to a frustration and disillusionment with the way organisations have accumulated real-time information about consumers without their knowledge and often without…

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Small-scale fisheries have unintended consequences on tropical marine ecosystems

Small-scale fisheries have unintended consequences on tropical marine ecosystems Fish fences are typically positioned on tropical seagrass meadows, which are important ecosystems for fish communities and the health of neighbouring habitats. Benjamin Jones/Project Seagrass Hundreds of millions of people in some of the world’s poorest countries are supported by small scale fisheries. These are usually self-employed fishers who use relatively simple methods, primarily to feed the local community and generate income. Though the impact of one small fishery may seem negligible, collectively they catch millions of tonnes per year, from some of the most biodiverse and threatened ecosystems on the planet. Managing these tropical fisheries should be a conservation priority as we strive for sustainability and try to protect fragile marine ecosystems in a changing climate. However, this management shouldn’t…

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