Our Strength Lies in Our Humanity

Everything is Connected

There are times in our lives when it’s easy to forget how connected everything is. Times when life gets a little too tough and stressful and we end up paying more attention to our own well being in a way that disregards the cost and the consequences to the world out there; the people, the environment and everything else that’s a part of it. We find ourselves being selfish – not because we want to be but because circumstances force us to be.

That’s how the world got into the state that it’s in now. Here’s a neat 20 minute video that explains it all.

On this website I’ll be exploring and adding videos and articles that help to expand and explain the rich and diverse complexity of the world we live in – complex but not complicated.

Latest News

NASA Television to Broadcast Next Space Station Crew Launch, Docking

[rNASA Television to Broadcast Next Space Station Crew Launch, Docking A multinational crew, including NASA astronaut Jessica Meir and the first space traveler from the United Arab Emirates (UAE), is scheduled to launch to the International Space Station Wednesday, Sept. 25. NASA Television and the agency’s website will provide live coverage of the crew’s launch…

NASA, Australian Space Agency to Sign Joint Statement at NASA Headquarters

[rNASA, Australian Space Agency to Sign Joint Statement at NASA Headquarters Media are invited to a joint signing ceremony between NASA and the Australian Space Agency at 9 a.m. EDT Saturday, Sept. 21, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Source: NASA Breaking news http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-australian-space-agency-to-sign-joint-statement-at-nasa-headquarters

The Technologies Giving Rise to the Spatial Web

The Technologies Giving Rise to the Spatial Web How each of us sees the world is about to change dramatically. For all of human history, the experience of looking at the world was roughly the same for everyone. But boundaries between the digital and physical are beginning to fade. The world around us is gaining…

If robots take our jobs, what will it mean for climate change?

If robots take our jobs, what will it mean for climate change? Suwin / shutterstock Nearly half of the tasks currently undertaken by humans could already be automated, even at current levels of technology. Within the next decade it is likely large sections of society will be looking for new jobs. People are calling it…

New X-ray laser technique reveals magnetic skyrmion fluctuations

A new ‘two-bucket’ method of delivering pairs of X-ray pulses gives a 1,000-fold improvement in seeing magnetic fluctuations that could lead to improved data storage materials. […] Read More

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Beating the heat with nanoparticle films

House and car windows that stay cool in the summer, warm in the winter. […] Read More

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Close encounters of the stellar kind

The movements of more than 300 000 stars surveyed by ESA’s Gaia satellite reveal that rare close encounters with our sun might disturb the cloud of comets at the far reaches of our solar system, sending some towards Earth in the distant future. […]Read More

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Controlling traffic on the graphene electron highway

Graphene may revolutionize electronics. But first, researchers need to get its electrons under control. […] Read More

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Advancing molecular ferroelectric thin-film technologies

Molecular ferroelectrics are highly desirable as they are environmentally friendly, light-weight, and high spontaneous polarized. Though intensive studies have been focused on molecular ferroelectrics, very few researchers have tried to address the issue of thin film growth. An international research team now presents the first report on the preparation of high-quality large area MOFE films using in-plane liquid phase growth. With this approach, different kinds of novel ferroelectric films can…

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Tweaking thermoelectric voltage across atomic-scale gold junction by mechanical force

Scientists achieved precise and fully reversible switching of the polarity of voltage produced by the thermoelectric effect across a gold junction with an atomic-scale contact. […] Read More

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Sharks with frickin’ lasers: Gold nanoparticles fry cancer on glowing mice

A new study takes a new approach to killing cancer: Why not fry it into oblivion with vibrating gold nanoparticles? “But what about the frickin’ lasers?” you may ask. Don’t worry. There are lasers. And bioluminescence too. […] Read More

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Good as gold

Researchers use gold nanoparticles to enhance the accuracy of biomedical tests, thereby eliminating false positive results. […] Read More

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Researchers propose how the universe became filled with light

Black holes may have punctured darkened galaxies, allowing light to escape. […]Read More

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ALMA finds huge hidden reservoirs of turbulent gas in distant galaxies

A team led by Edith Falgarone (Ecole Normale Supérieure and Observatoire de Paris, France) has used the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to detect signatures of the carbon hydride CH+ in distant starburst galaxies. The group identified strong signals of CH+ in five out of the six galaxies studied, including the Cosmic Eyelash (eso1012). This research provides new information that helps astronomers understand the growth of galaxies and how a galaxy’s surroundings fuel star formation. […]Read More

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Researchers propose how the universe became filled with light

Soon after the Big Bang, the universe went completely dark. The intense, seminal event that created the cosmos churned up so much hot, thick gas that light was completely trapped. Much later—perhaps as many as one billion years after the Big Bang—the universe expanded, became more transparent, and eventually filled up with galaxies, planets, stars, and other objects that give off visible light. That’s the universe we know today. […]Read More

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Scientists recover nova first spotted 600 years ago by Korean astrologers

On a cold March night in Seoul almost 600 years ago, Korean astrologers spotted a bright new star in the tail of the constellation Scorpius. It was seen for just 14 days before fading from view. From these ancient records, modern astronomers determined that what the Royal Imperial Astrologers saw was a nova explosion, but they had been unable to find the binary star system that caused it—until now. A new study published today by the journal Nature pinpoints the location of the old nova, which now undergoes smaller-scale “dwarf nova” eruptions. The work supports that idea that novae go through a very long-term life cycle after erupting, fading to obscurity for thousands of years, and then building back up to become full-fledged novae once more. […]Read More

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Second Hyperloop Pod Design Competition A Success

The second Hyperloop Pod Design Competition was a success, with teams from all over the world testing their pod car designs at SpaceX test track in California. The post Second Hyperloop Pod Design Competition A Success appeared first on Universe Today. […]Read More

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