Our Strength Lies in Our Humanity

Everything is Connected

There are times in our lives when it’s easy to forget how connected everything is. Times when life gets a little too tough and stressful and we end up paying more attention to our own well being in a way that disregards the cost and the consequences to the world out there; the people, the environment and everything else that’s a part of it. We find ourselves being selfish – not because we want to be but because circumstances force us to be.

That’s how the world got into the state that it’s in now. Here’s a neat 20 minute video that explains it all.

On this website I’ll be exploring and adding videos and articles that help to expand and explain the rich and diverse complexity of the world we live in – complex but not complicated.

Latest News

These Are the Meta-Trends Shaping the Future (at Breakneck Speed)

These Are the Meta-Trends Shaping the Future (at Breakneck Speed) Life is pretty different now than it was 20 years ago, or even 10 years ago. It’s sort of exciting, and sort of scary. And hold onto your hat, because it’s going to keep changing—even faster than it already has been. The good news is,…

Harvard’s Smart Exo-Shorts Talk to the Cloud to Help You Walk and Run

Harvard’s Smart Exo-Shorts Talk to the Cloud to Help You Walk and Run Exosuits don’t generally scream “fashionable” or “svelte.” Take the mind-controlled robotic exoskeleton that allowed a paraplegic man to kick off the World Cup back in 2014. Is it cool? Hell yeah. Is it practical? Not so much. Yapping about wearability might seem…

Designing new ways to make use of ocean plastic

Designing new ways to make use of ocean plastic Even remote beaches are often strewn with plastic debris. Susan White/USFWS, CC BY Beachcombing has long been a part of life for island communities. On the southwestern edge of Scarp, a small, treeless island off the coast of Harris in Scotland’s Outer Hebrides, the Mol Mòr…

Stolen fingerprints could spell the end of biometric security – here’s how to save it

Stolen fingerprints could spell the end of biometric security – here’s how to save it Pormezz/Shutterstock The biggest known biometric data breach to date was reported recently when researchers managed to access a 23-gigabyte database of more than 27.8m records including fingerprint and facial recognition data. The researchers, working with cyber-security firm VPNMentor, said that…

Scientists watch ‘artificial atoms’ assemble into perfect lattices with many uses

Some of the world’s tiniest crystals are known as ‘artificial atoms’ because they can organize themselves into structures that look like molecules, including ‘superlattices’ that are potential building blocks for novel materials. Now scientists have made the first observation of these nanocrystals rapidly forming superlattices while they are themselves still growing. […] Read More

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Single-photon emitter has promise for quantum info-processing

Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced the first known material capable of single-photon emission at room temperature and at telecommunications wavelengths. These carbon nanotube quantum light emitters may be important for optically-based quantum information processing and information security, while also being of significant interest for ultrasensitive sensing, metrology and imaging needs and as photon sources for fundamental advances in quantum optics studies. The research was reported today in the journal…

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Single-photon emitter has promise for quantum info-processing

Scientists have produced the first known material capable of single-photon emission at room temperature and at telecommunications wavelengths. […] Read More

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It’s never too cold for quantum

The peculiar characteristics demonstrated by quantum critical points at absolute zero remain one of the great unsolved mysteries of science. […] Read More

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Detecting radio waves with entangled atoms

Researchers have harnessed the weirdness of quantum entanglement to detect ultra-faint radio signals, explains a new report. […] Read More

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It’s never too cold for quantum

The peculiar characteristics demonstrated by ‘quantum critical points’ at absolute zero remain one of the great unsolved mysteries of science. […] Read More

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Detecting radio waves with entangled atoms

In a study published in Physics Review Letters and highlighted by APS Physics, ICFO researchers demonstrate a new technique for the coherent detection of radio frequency magnetic fields using an atomic magnetometer. They used highly sensitive, nondestructive measurements to entangle the atoms while maintaining their collective coherence, and a new technique to allow the coherent buildup of signal from arbitrarily shaped waveforms. […] Read More

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Clarifiying complex chemical processes with quantum computers

Science and the IT industry have high hopes for quantum computing, but descriptions of possible applications tend to be vague. Researchers have now come up with a concrete example that demonstrates what quantum computers will actually be able to achieve in the future. […] Read More

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Research and design for carbon quantum dots catalysts

A new study that provides a new approach for the rational design of carbon quantum dots (CQD) modified catalysts with potential applications in energy and environmental areas. The study discusses the introduction of CQDs into Bi2WO6 photocatalyst and the demonstration of its good photocatalytic performance in pollutant degradation and hydrogen evolution. […] Read More

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Improving understanding of the quantum world with quantum dots

Quantum behavior plays a crucial role in novel and emergent material properties, such as superconductivity and magnetism. Unfortunately, it is still impossible to calculate the underlying quantum behavior, let alone fully understand it. Scientists of QuTech, the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience in Delft and TNO, in collaboration with ETH Zurich and the University of Maryland, have now succeeded in building an “artificial material” that mimics this type of quantum behavior on a small scale. In doing so, they have laid the foundations for new insights and potential applications. Their work is published today in Nature. […] Read More

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Using angles to improve the future of electronics

Coherent commensurate electronic states at the interface between misoriented graphene layers. […] Read More

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Metal-free nanoparticle could expand MRI use, tumor detection

A new metal-free nanoparticle could help circumvent the health- and age-related barriers to MRIs, which physicians use to investigate or confirm a broad range of medical issues. […] Read More

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Spin dynamics of graphene explained through supercomputing

A new paper sheds light on previously-unexplained results observed in experiments to detect and quantify the spin Hall effect in graphene-based heterostructures. […] Read More

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