Our Strength Lies in Our Humanity

Everything is Connected

There are times in our lives when it’s easy to forget how connected everything is. Times when life gets a little too tough and stressful and we end up paying more attention to our own well being in a way that disregards the cost and the consequences to the world out there; the people, the environment and everything else that’s a part of it. We find ourselves being selfish – not because we want to be but because circumstances force us to be.

That’s how the world got into the state that it’s in now. Here’s a neat 20 minute video that explains it all.

On this website I’ll be exploring and adding videos and articles that help to expand and explain the rich and diverse complexity of the world we live in – complex but not complicated.

Latest News

ADHD: how race for the Moon revealed America’s first hyperactive children

ADHD: how race for the Moon revealed America’s first hyperactive children America's space race with Russia revealed an education system that was not up to the task, with many children diagnosed with ADHD. Shutterstock As the world commemorates the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing, we can appreciate the numerous technological advances that have…

Helping smokers quit: financial incentives work

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Breastfeeding support cuts are leaving unpaid volunteers to fill the role of public health

Breastfeeding support cuts are leaving unpaid volunteers to fill the role of public health Anton Korobkov/Shutterstock Support plays a vital role in enabling women to breastfeed for longer. It helps solve many different challenges, stops physical and emotional pain, and helps women feel accepted as part of a community. Yet across the UK, many breastfeeding…

Space radiation: the Apollo crews were extremely lucky – future astronauts may not be

Space radiation: the Apollo crews were extremely lucky – future astronauts may not be Apollo Lunar Rover – Apollo 15. Irwin with the LRV on the Moon As the 50th anniversary of humankind’s first moon landing approaches, the conspiracy theories that claim the Apollo missions were a hoax refuse to die. One perennial anomaly pointed…

Eating disorders: early warning signs identified

Eating disorders: early warning signs identified Photographee.eu/Shutterstock More than 1.6m people in the UK alone are estimated to have an eating disorder such as anorexia or bulimia. These disorders predominantly affect vulnerable women, but men can develop them too, and most people are diagnosed during adolescence and early adulthood. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for those with an eating disorder but many people do not always seek help –…

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Transfer deadline medicals – how inaccurate tests may lead to clubs making the wrong decisions about players

Transfer deadline medicals – how inaccurate tests may lead to clubs making the wrong decisions about players Pexels The football transfer deadline day is a highly anticipated event in any fan’s calendar. Signing one or two key players can be the difference between winning the league or relegation. But before a footballer can be signed, they have to pass a medical to see if they are “fit”. Premier League clubs…

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Armyworms are devastating Asia’s crops, but we have a plan to save them

Armyworms are devastating Asia’s crops, but we have a plan to save them Mikhail Kochiev/Shutterstock A very hungry caterpillar is rampaging through crops across the world, leaving a trail of destruction in its wake. The fall armyworm, also known as Spodoptera frugiperda (fruit destroyer), loves to eat maize (corn) but also plagues many other crops vital to human food security, such as rice and sorghum. This invasive eating machine originated…

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Billie Eilish and Tourette’s: our new study reveals what it’s really like to live with the condition

Billie Eilish and Tourette’s: our new study reveals what it’s really like to live with the condition The American singer Billie Eilish recently spoke to her fans about having struggled with Tourette’s syndrome since she was a child. She’d previously avoided going public about her diagnosis as she said she didn’t want to be characterised by her condition. The hallmark of Tourette’s is tics. These can be motor tics, such…

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Eight ways to halt a global food crisis

Eight ways to halt a global food crisis Stockr/Shutterstock.com There are serious challenges to global food supply everywhere we look. Intensive use of fertilisers in the US Midwest is causing nutrients to run off into rivers and streams, degrading the water quality and causing a Connecticut-size dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico. Chocolate production will soon be challenged in West Africa – home to over half of global production.…

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Almost a third of Scots are now obese – and at risk of more cancers than smokers

Almost a third of Scots are now obese – and at risk of more cancers than smokers Shutterstock Once smoking was the killer health problem in Scotland. Now comes the news from Cancer Research that around 29% of adults in Scotland are obese whereas 18% of the population continues to smoke. In the early 1980s the figures were markedly different, at around 6% and 40% respectively. That means in just…

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Cori Gauff: the support network behind 15-year-old who beat Venus Williams

Cori Gauff: the support network behind 15-year-old who beat Venus Williams Until recently, it seems likely that only dedicated tennis fans had heard of Cori Gauff: the second youngest winner of the Junior French Open in 2018, she was one to watch – but it’s unlikely anyone predicted just how fast her star would rise. Yet the youngest player in the professional era to qualify for the main draw at…

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New study shows public wants renewables – but the government is not listening

New study shows public wants renewables – but the government is not listening Jevanto Productions / shutterstock Subsidies for onshore wind power were cut by the UK government in 2015. Then the main reasons given were that it was too expensive and that the public didn’t support it. Amber Rudd MP, then head of what was the Department of Energy and Climate Change, said in a statement to parliament: “We…

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Scientists may soon be able to predict your memories – here’s how

Scientists may soon be able to predict your memories – here’s how Veles Studio/Shutterstock Do you remember your first kiss? What about your grandma dying? Chances are you do, and that’s because emotional memories are at the core of our personal life story. Some rare moments are just incredibly intense and stand out from an otherwise repetitive existence of sleeping, eating and working. That said, daily life, too, is replete with experiences that have a personal emotional significance – such as disagreeing with someone or receiving a compliment. Most of us are able to describe emotional memories in some detail, even after a long time, while memories of more mundane experiences and events fade away. But exactly why that is and how we actually remember remains unclear. In our new…

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Impact of child mental health problems is worse than 40 years ago – our new study suggests

Impact of child mental health problems is worse than 40 years ago – our new study suggests smolaw/Shutterstock In England, rates of childhood mental health disorders have increased in the past 20 years. The proportion of five to 15-year-olds with a mental health disorder rose from 9.7% in 1999 to 11.2% in 2017, with emotional disorders (such as depression and anxiety) becoming more common in particular. Now, on average, three children in a class of 30 will have a mental health disorder. Awareness of mental health problems has increased too, and a number of policy changes and novel treatments have been introduced to specifically target children’s mental health. But our research suggests that children with mental health problems have worse relationships with their peers, worse grades at school and worse…

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Five reasons future space travel should explore asteroids

Five reasons future space travel should explore asteroids Alexyz3d/Shutterstock On the same day that the Earth survived an expected near-miss with asteroid 367943 Duende, Russian dashcams unexpectedly captured footage of a different asteroid as it slammed into the atmosphere, exploded, and injured more than 1,000 people. That day in Chelyabinsk in February 2013 reminded the world that the Earth does not exist in a bubble. Asteroids provide a direct connection between the Earth and interplanetary space. Craters such as the Barringer Crater in Arizona are a stark reminder. The dinosaurs died out due to a different impact not far away in the Gulf of Mexico. But elsewhere in the universe, asteroids may actually transport life between different planets. While the world reflects on the first flight to the moon and…

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Reforesting an area the size of the US needed to help avert climate breakdown, say researchers – are they right?

Reforesting an area the size of the US needed to help avert climate breakdown, say researchers – are they right? Inga Linder/Shutterstock Restoring the world’s forests on an unprecedented scale is “the best climate change solution available”, according to a new study. The researchers claim that covering 900m hectares of land – roughly the size of the continental US – with trees could store up to 205 billion tonnes of carbon, about two thirds of the carbon that humans have already put into the atmosphere. While the best solution to climate change remains leaving fossil fuels in the ground, we will still need to suck carbon dioxide (CO₂) out of the atmosphere this century if we are to keep global warming below 1.5˚C. So the idea of reforesting much of…

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E-cigarettes: why I’m optimistic they will stub smoking out for good

E-cigarettes: why I’m optimistic they will stub smoking out for good Shutterstock/Lumen Photos There are over a billion smokers across the world – a habit which causes more than 7m deaths per year. We have known that smoking kills for decades, but this simple fact has not been enough to persuade every smoker to quit. Even more surprising is that the vast amount of evidence about the risks of smoking hasn’t been enough to put people off starting to smoke in the first place. If knowing smoking kills doesn’t stop people from taking up the habit, what will? I believe e-cigarettes provide real hope. Available since 2007, these devices often contain nicotine, the addictive substance in cigarettes, but without many of the harmful toxicants. Consequently, they are proving to be…

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