Our Strength Lies in Our Humanity

Everything is Connected

There are times in our lives when it’s easy to forget how connected everything is. Times when life gets a little too tough and stressful and we end up paying more attention to our own well being in a way that disregards the cost and the consequences to the world out there; the people, the environment and everything else that’s a part of it. We find ourselves being selfish – not because we want to be but because circumstances force us to be.

That’s how the world got into the state that it’s in now. Here’s a neat 20 minute video that explains it all.

On this website I’ll be exploring and adding videos and articles that help to expand and explain the rich and diverse complexity of the world we live in – complex but not complicated.

Latest News

Breakthrough nanoscience discovery made on flight from New York to Jerusalem

Jerusalem (SPX) Feb 20, 2019 Professor Uri Banin, founder of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, and his colleagues Professor Richard…

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Nanoparticle computing takes a giant step forward

Seoul, South Korea (SPX) Feb 26, 2019 Computation is a ubiquitous concept in physical sciences, biology, and engineering, where it provides many critical capabilities. Historically,…

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Nano drops a million times smaller than a teardrop explodes 19th century theory

Warwick UK (SPX) Feb 13, 2019 Droplets emanating from a molecular “nano-tap” would behave very differently from those from a household tap 1 million times…

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How our gray matter tackles gray areas

Marshall Scholar Katie O’Nell investigates how the brain resolves complicated questions involving morality and generosity.

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Novel nanoparticle to remove cadmium toxicity from freshwater systems

Researchers found that sulfurized nano-zero-valent iron picked up cadmium from a watery medium and alleviated cadmium toxicity to that alga for more than a month. […] Read More

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Has the First Interstellar Comet Been Discovered?

Astronomers have found a comet with a possible interstellar trajectory. Comet C/2017 U1 PANSTARRS seems to have come from outside the Solar System. The post Has the First Interstellar Comet Been Discovered? appeared first on Universe Today. […]Read More

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Project Blue: Building a Space Telescope that Could Directly Observe Planets Around Alpha Centauri

An international consortium of scientists known as Project Blue hopes to crowdfund the creation of a space telescope that will allow us to directly image planets in the neighboring Alpha Centauri system. The post Project Blue: Building a Space Telescope that Could Directly Observe Planets Around Alpha Centauri appeared first on Universe Today. […]Read More

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New evidence for dark matter makes it even more exotic

Galaxy clusters are the largest known structures in the Universe, containing thousands of galaxies and hot gas. But more importantly, they contain the mysterious dark matter, which accounts for 27 percent of all matter and energy. Current models of dark matter predict that galaxy clusters have very dense cores, and those cores contain a very massive galaxy that never moves from the cluster’s center. […]Read More

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Revealing galactic secrets

Captured using the exceptional sky-surveying abilities of the VLT Survey Telescope (VST) at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile, this deep view reveals the secrets of the luminous members of the Fornax Cluster, one of the richest and closest galaxy clusters to the Milky Way. […]Read More

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Wave nature of delocalized electrons in defective hydrocarbons at the origin of cosmic infrared emission

A new study in Physical Review Letters reveals that the series of infrared (IR) band peaks, collectively known as the cosmic unidentified IR emission, arises as a consequence of the wavelike behavior of delocalized electrons in hydrocarbon compounds. An essential aspect of these compounds is that they undergo structural transformations triggered by starlight absorption. These transformations described as defects affect the wave motion of delocalized electrons, that is, electrons that…

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Dark matter: The mystery substance physics still can?t identify that makes up the majority of our universe

One of the most vexing gets at the heart of what our universe is actually made of. Cosmological observations have determined the average density of matter in our universe to very high precision. But this density turns out to be much greater than can be accounted for with ordinary atoms. […]Read More

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Monster image of the Fornax Galaxy Cluster

Countless galaxies vie for attention in this monster image of the Fornax Galaxy Cluster, some appearing only as pinpricks of light while others dominate the foreground. One of these is the lenticular galaxy NGC 1316. The turbulent past of this much-studied galaxy has left it with a delicate structure of loops, arcs and rings that astronomers have now imaged in greater detail than ever before with the VLT Survey Telescope.…

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Unconfirmed exomoon could be unlike any of those in our solar system

René Heller, a space scientist with the Maxx Planck Institute for Solar System Research has uploaded a paper to the arXiv preprint server offering possible attributes for the still-unconfirmed exomoon Kepler 1625 b-i. He suggests that if the exomoon does truly exist, it is probably unlike any of the moons in our solar system, which suggests that theories about the origins of moons might have to be expanded. […]Read More

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Water Worlds Don’t Stay Wet for Very Long

A new study led by Princeton University shows that water worlds are likely to be stripped of their atmospheres (and most of their water) before too long The post Water Worlds Don’t Stay Wet for Very Long appeared first on Universe Today. […]Read More

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Neptune-Sized Exomoon Found Orbiting a Jupiter-Sized Planet?

A new study by an astrophysicists from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research shows that the first exomoon ever discovered could actually be a gas giant moon! The post Neptune-Sized Exomoon Found Orbiting a Jupiter-Sized Planet? appeared first on Universe Today. […]Read More

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Models clarify physics at photocathode surfaces

Advances in materials science have improved the composition of materials used in photocathode production that can operate at visible wavelengths and produce a beam with reduced transverse electron momentum spread; however, the surface roughness of the photocathode continues to limit beam properties. Researchers created computer models to bridge the gap to provide a better picture of the physics at the surface of the photocathode. […] Read More

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Plastic and metal-organic frameworks partner for sensing and storage

A marriage between 3-D printer plastic and a versatile material for detecting and storing gases could lead to inexpensive sensors and fuel cell batteries alike. […] Read More

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