Our Strength Lies in Our Humanity

Everything is Connected

There are times in our lives when it’s easy to forget how connected everything is. Times when life gets a little too tough and stressful and we end up paying more attention to our own well being in a way that disregards the cost and the consequences to the world out there; the people, the environment and everything else that’s a part of it. We find ourselves being selfish – not because we want to be but because circumstances force us to be.

That’s how the world got into the state that it’s in now. Here’s a neat 20 minute video that explains it all.

On this website I’ll be exploring and adding videos and articles that help to expand and explain the rich and diverse complexity of the world we live in – complex but not complicated.

Latest News

The Earth’s magnetic north pole is shifting rapidly – so what will happen to the northern lights?

The Earth’s magnetic north pole is shifting rapidly – so what will happen to the northern lights? Northern lights in Lake Lappajärvi, Finland. Santeri Viinamäki, CC BY-SA Like most planets in our solar system, the Earth has its own magnetic field. Thanks to its largely molten iron core, our planet is in fact a bit…

Texas Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut on International Space Station

[rTexas Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut on International Space Station Students in Texas will have an opportunity next week to speak with a NASA astronaut aboard the International Space Station. Source: Eurogamer. http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/texas-students-to-speak-with-nasa-astronaut-on-international-space-station

We’ve declared a climate emergency – here’s what universal basic income could do to help the planet

We’ve declared a climate emergency – here’s what universal basic income could do to help the planet Governments around the world are declaring “climate and environmental emergencies” to highlight the unsustainable ways in which humans, over a few generations, have transformed the planet. We’ve made enough concrete to cover the entire surface of the Earth…

How Japan’s renewables-powered Olympics could kick off a global race for clean energy

How Japan’s renewables-powered Olympics could kick off a global race for clean energy Japan is aiming to host the first Olympic Games powered solely by renewable sources. If successful, this could help the country carve a new niche in the global order as a champion of climate action and environmental protection – and set off…

Ions in the spotlight

New scientific results have been given a special place in the Nature Photonics journal. They focus on the effective isolation of ions in optical and electrostatic traps. […] Read More

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New, simplified technique makes light metallic nanofoam

A simple method for manufacturing extremely low-density palladium nanofoams could help advance hydrogen storage technologies. […] Read More

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A strange new world of light

Metasurface generates new states of light for fundamental research and applications. […] Read More

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Nanosensors demystify brain chemistry

Nanosensors are incredible information-gathering tools for myriad applications, including molecular targets such as the brain. […] Read More

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Overlooked treasure—the first evidence of exoplanets

Beneath an elegant office building with a Spanish-style red tiled roof in Pasadena, California, three timeworn storerooms safeguard more than a century of astronomy. Down the stairs and to the right is a basement of wonder. There are countless wooden drawers and boxes, stacked floor to ceiling, with telescope plates, sunspot drawings and other records. A faint ammonia-like smell, reminiscent of old film, fills the air. […]Read More

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Neutron star merger confirms decades of predictions

On Aug. 17, the Laser Interferometry Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detected the fifth fingerprint of a massive disturbance in spacetime since LIGO began operations in September 2015. Unlike the first four sets of ripples, which reflected collisions between two black holes, the shape of these spacetime distortions suggested a collision between two neutron stars. […]Read More

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Study of W Hydrae suggests condensed aluminum oxide dust plays key role in accelerating stellar wind

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan has found evidence showing that condensed aluminum oxide dust surrounding the star W Hydrae plays a key role in accelerating the stellar wind. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the team describes their study of the star and the gases that surround it. […]Read More

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Atmospheric beacons guide NASA scientists in search for life

Some exoplanets shine brighter than others in the search for life beyond the solar system. New NASA research proposes a novel approach to sniffing out exoplanet atmospheres. It takes advantage of frequent stellar storms—which hurl huge clouds of stellar material and radiation into space—from cool, young dwarf stars to highlight signs of habitable exoplanets. […]Read More

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New white paper maps the very real risks that quantum attacks will pose for Bitcoin

Combining expertise in quantum technologies and cryptography, researchers have been projecting future dates that quantum computers could jeopardise the security of current cryptocurrencies, a market now worth over USD $150 billion, and assessing countermeasures to such attacks. […] Read More

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A bit of a ‘quantum magic trick’—experiment shows how to speed up frequency measurement

An accurate analog clock tick-tick-ticks with a constant precision and well known frequency: one tick per second. The longer you let it tick, the better to test its accuracy —10 times as long corresponds to a ten-fold improvement in any frequency uncertainty. But is there a faster way to determine a frequency? […] Read More

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A bit of a ‘quantum magic trick’: Experiment shows how to speed up frequency measurement

Is there a faster way to determine a frequency? It turns out there is. […] Read More

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Electrostatic force takes charge in bioinspired polymers

Scientists have taken the first steps toward gaining control over the self-assembly of synthetic materials in the same way that biology forms natural polymers. […] Read More

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Honey, I shrunk the features for low-cost, flexible, large-area electronics

Exploiting reversible solubility allows for direct, optical patterning of unprecedentedly small features. […] Read More

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