Our Strength Lies in Our Humanity

Nicotine replacement: when quitting cigarettes, consider using more nicotine, not less

A recent Cochrane review came to a surprising conclusion.

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Caster Semenya v IAAF: ruling will have big implications for women’s participation in sport

Arbitration case between athlete Caster Semenya and the IAAF centres on eligibility to compete based on testosterone – but there are other factors in play.

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Testosterone: why defining a ‘normal’ level is hard to do

So-called normal levels of testosterone are approximations, but can help researchers investigate disease and treatments.

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DNA analysis finds that type of grass pollen, not total count, could be important for allergy sufferers

Pollen counts focus on the amount of grains in the air, but it could be the species that are more important.

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Does a year in space make you older or younger?

Does a year in space make you older or younger? Are space twin Scott and Earth twin Mark no longer identical? Robert Markowitz/NASA Susan Bailey, Colorado State University Daily life aboard the International Space Station moves fast. Really fast. Traveling at approximately 17,000 miles per hour, 300 miles above the Earth, astronauts watch 16 sunrises and sunsets every “day” while floating around in a box with a handful of people they depend on for survival. One need look no further than Hollywood blockbusters like “The Martian,” “Gravity” and “Interstellar” for futuristic visions of life beyond Earth as we venture longer and deeper into outer space. But what about the human body’s response to real-life spaceflight – what are the health effects? Will space travelers age at different rates than those…

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Hyperhidrosis: the excessive sweating condition that could ruin your life

For the roughly 3% of people who have this condition, sweating can be almost constant.

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Women face enough barriers to breastfeeding — incorrect medication advice should not be one of them

Mothers are told to stop breastfeeding when taking certain medications – even if they won’t harm their baby.

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How our sense of taste changes as we age

As we get older, the way we experience taste can change drastically – but it’s not all down to one sense.

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Empathy is the secret ingredient that makes cooperation – and civilization – possible

Empathy is the secret ingredient that makes cooperation – and civilization – possible What goes into all for one and one for all? Africa Studio/Shutterstock.com Arunas L. Radzvilavicius, University of Pennsylvania Human societies are so prosperous mostly because of how altruistic we are. Unlike other animals, people cooperate even with complete strangers. We share knowledge on Wikipedia, we show up to vote, and we work together to responsibly manage natural resources. But where do these cooperative skills come from and why don’t our selfish instincts overwhelm them? Using a branch of mathematics called evolutionary game theory to explore this feature of human societies, my collaborators and I found that empathy – a uniquely human capacity to take another person’s perspective – might be responsible for sustaining such extraordinarily high levels…

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Vacuum cleaner for the brain: doctor’s first-hand account of using groundbreaking stroke treatment

The story of the first thrombectomy in Europe by the surgeon who performed it.

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