Brexit


  • Conference on the Future of Europe: civil society should take the lead
    The upcoming Conference on the Future of Europe offers a unique opportunity for EU citizens to express their views on the direction of travel for the Union, particularly through the intermediary of civil society. A recently published LSE IDEAS report, ‘The Rise of Insurgent Europeanism’, discusses new visions of Europe…
  • Can Global Britain be achieved through WTO negotiations?
    The multilateral e-commerce negotiations presently being conducted within the World Trade Organization signify a new era within the global trading regime. In an attempt to repair the dysfunctional and log-jammed WTO through a modernized update on digital trading rules and regulations, the organisation now stands at a critical crossroads in…
  • Global Britain should look towards supporting the development of Africa’s digital landscape
    Global Britain should look towards supporting the development of Africa’s digital landscape, argue Pauline Girma and Oona Palmer (LSE). In this post, they explain that given that seven of the ten fastest-growing internet populations are located in Africa, and that it is home to what is the youngest population in the…
  • Is plurilateralism the way forward for Global Britain’s e-commerce ambitions?
    Following Brexit, the UK became a WTO member in its own right. Is plurilateralism the way forward for Global Britain’s e-commerce ambitions, ask Alexanne Dieu and Samuel Richardson (LSE)? In 2017, the road to the 11th WTO Ministerial Conference in Buenos Aires was bleak. Between Donald Trump’s hawkish approach to…
  • The EU helped to end the armed campaign of the Provisional IRA
    The role of the European Union in the ending of the armed campaign of the Provisional IRA should not be underestimated, argues Darren Litter (Queen’s University Belfast). The historical indispensability of the EU to the UK and Ireland’s ability to strike the delicate balance that is the Northern Ireland peace process must be considered…
  • The UK’s union has been fractured by Brexit
    Brexit has removed the EU as an external support system that prevented devolution from escalating and undermining the union. In this edited extract from his new book, State and Nation in the United Kingdom: The Fractured Union, Michael Keating (University of Aberdeen) warns that the Conservative Party’s vision of the UK…
  • A big challenge for ‘Global Britain’ is digital trade
    Britain has entered the World Trade Organisation system as an independent player. One of the next big things on the WTO’s agenda is to decide on the rules that will govern digital trade. In the first of a series of posts, Steve Woolcock (LSE) discusses the state of the plurilateral…
  • Don’t forget the countryside: rural communities and Brexit
    The relationship between rural areas and Brexit has been neglected in a preoccupation with the urban geographies of the ‘left behind’ and the political arguments about culture wars. How might the patterns of the 2016 referendum vote be interrogated to provide insights about social and economic changes in rural places…
  • The totality of UK-Irish relations is at risk because of Brexit
    The European Union was a crucial element of the totality of UK-Irish relationships that would allow for the 1998 Good Friday Agreement, Darren Litter (Queen’s University Belfast). The UK and Ireland’s historic achievement of the 1998 Good Friday Agreement (GFA) is most synonymous with the inter-prime ministerial partnership of Tony…
  • The role of the European Parliament in managing Brexit
    What influence did the European Parliament have in the Brexit negotiations? How did Brexit affect the distribution of power inside the European Parliament? In this post, Edoardo Bressanelli, Nicola Chelotti and Wilhelm Lehmann analyse the role of the European Parliament in managing Brexit. Politics and Governance has recently published a Thematic Issue…
  • Scotland’s route to EU membership
    In this post, Darryn Nyatanga analyses the possibilities and the difficulties involved with EU accession for an independent Scotland, which will be a major issue in a future Indyref campaign. With the May 2021 Holyrood elections coming up, the SNP-led Scottish government have stated that their constitutional objective for Scotland is independence…
  • UK financial services should shift their focus away from equivalence
    The UK should move forward from financial services equivalence with the EU, writes Apostolos Thomadakis (CEPS). Furthermore, it should develop a clear focus for the City of London as a non-EU financial centre. After nine rounds of negotiations held between March and October 2020, covering eleven areas, the EU-UK Trade…
  • Global Britain: Lesser Britain?
    Will Global Britain end up being Lesser Britain, asks Michael Cox (LSE)? In this blog, he points to the high international price the UK will be paying for Brexit. ‘Global Britain’ will be a ‘Lesser Britain’, he concludes.  One of the many claims made in favour of Brexit was not…
  • The Brexit vaccine war is a failure of empathy
    The UK-EU vaccine war is a failure of empathy, writes Tony Hockley (LSE). He argues that the current blame game is a manifestation of deep-rooted political challenges originating from Brexit. The UK and EU are still tightly bound by the complexities of vaccine supply chains. They are, however, divided by…
  • Who meets the EU’s Chief Negotiator?
    In this blog, David Coen (UCL) and Alexander Katsaitis (LSE) shed light on the interest groups meeting with the EU’s Chief Negotiator, Michel Barnier, and discusses what this means for Brexit and future negotiations on the UK’s relationship with the EU. Organized interests are a key component of policy discussions. Researchers and public…
  • Is Brexit the end of the first of two unions?
    The case for Brexit largely rested on the assumption that the United Kingdom is a unitary nation-state in which the people give effect to their will through a unitary and all-powerful Parliament. In this post, Michael Keating (University of Aberdeen) uncovers the shortcomings of such an approach and asks whether Brexit marks…
  • Business has been a bystander to Brexit
    In 2016, while pro-Brexit voices characterised the vote as a stand-off between ordinary people and the elite, a striking feature of the campaign and its aftermath is the limited role played by one important elite actor, namely business. Why was business a bystander to the Brexit process, ask Magnus Feldmann…
  • Forging a new relationship in the crucible of Northern Ireland: why the UK needs the EU to trust it
    We are in for a long, bumpy, and, potentially, dangerous ride as the UK and EU work out how to live next to each other in a post-Brexit world. Successfully forging a new relationship in the crucible of Northern Ireland requires the EU to trust the UK, argues Sydney Nash.…
  • The ECJ used to be a neutral court for the UK – it no longer is
    In the UK, the ECJ had been called a foreign court in the Brexit debate. However, the term comes from Switzerland. The notion of a foreign court was used to refer to an international court that includes judges from other states. However, this notion is fallacious, argues Carl Baudenbacher (LSE). The decisive factor is whether…
  • Ireland/Northern Ireland Protocol: the EU must play the long-game
    Northern Ireland is now officially still in the customs territory of the UK and still an integral part of the UK internal market. Consequently, the Ireland/Northern Ireland Protocol that regulates this state of affairs is no ordinary international arrangement. Recent moves from the UK side have not been welcome by the EU. It…
  • Stop worrying and love the Ireland/Northern Ireland Protocol
    Colin Murray (Newcastle Law School) argues that Northern Ireland’s Unionist Parties should rein in their opposition to the Ireland/Northern Ireland Protocol. Brexit has undoubtedly produced many immediate dislocations, but these could be mitigated under the Withdrawal Agreement processes and over time the unique access to the Single Market that Northern Ireland retained…
  • Brexit heralds a bleak future for the City of London
    Brexit heralds a bleak future for the City of London writes Sven Van Kerckhoven (Brussels School of Governance). He argues that the temporary equivalence frameworks that have been put into place recently buy the EU time to strengthen its financial governance system in preparation for the exodus of the City’s financial industry.…
  • Long read | Future British-European security relations are a matter of trust
    Trust between the EU and the UK is in short supply. This poses risks to British-European security relations, writes Gijs de Vries (LSE). As Brexit unfolds, three issues, in particular, may give rise to tensions: data protection, human rights, and external security cooperation.   While the ink on the 2020…
  • The UK economy is paying a heavy price for Johnson’s hubris
    Brexit in its basic definition of the UK having left the European Union is done. Yet, the UK economy is only being to paying the price for Boris Johnson’s hubris during the negotiations with the EU, writes John Ryan (CESifo). On 24 December 2020, Christmas’ Eve, the European Union (EU)…
  • The EU diaspora in the UK cannot be ignored
    While formally Brexit may be behind us, the EU diaspora in the UK is becoming a political actor Brexiters could not foresee, write Zana Vathi and Ruxandra Trandafoiu (Edge Hill University). They argue that a ‘civic’ Europeanness was activated by Brexit and has started to create bridges among Europeans in the UK who…
  • Brexit means Brexit for the City of London
    As of 2021 UK financial firms lost access to the EU single market and now need regulatory equivalence to do business on the continent. Brexit really does mean Brexit for the City of London, writes John Ryan (LSE). Prime minister Boris Johnson spoke about the new trade deal struck between the UK…
  • Untruthful Brexit rhetoric has undermined representative democracy in the UK
    Throughout the run-up to the signing of the EU-UK withdrawal agreement as well as the trade deal, the British government’s public rhetoric on Brexit has been criticised for being misleading and insincere. Sten Hansson (University of Tartu/University of Birmingham) and Sandra Kröger (University of Exeter) argue that there are four…
  • “Free us”: the DUP’s Northern Ireland Protocol strategy
    Following weeks of disrupted trade flows, rejected calls to invoke Article 16, security concerns for officials conducting checks required at ports, and a European Commission misjudgement which would have seen Article 16 invoked, enough has been enough for Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party (DUP). In a statement issued by the Democratic…
  • Scottish independence would be 2-3 times more costly than Brexit, and rejoining the EU won’t make up the difference
    In this blog, Hanwei Huang, Thomas Sampson and Patrick Schneider (LSE) analyse the economics of Scottish independence by looking at its impact on trade. Independence would put a new border between Scotland and the rest of the UK, introducing new trade costs. They find that since the rest of the…
  • Will Brexit become another Munich or Suez?
    Brexit marks a seemingly decisive pivot away from Europe. This decision dominated not by a view of the future, but by a view of the past bears striking resemblance to the geopolitical blunders of Munich and Suez, the consequences of which were the opposite of those intended. Nicholas Wescott (SOAS)…