FTC Unveils New Rule Banning Companies From Using Noncompete Clauses

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced on Thursday that it has proposed a sweeping new rule that would bar employers from imposing noncompete clauses on workers, a move that could have major benefits for tens millions of workers across the U.S. The FTC said that employers’ use of noncompete clauses, which typically prohibit workers from moving jobs to competitors within certain time frames… Source Source / Read More: FTC Unveils New Rule Banning Companies From Using Noncompete Clauses

DOJ Won Antitrust Victory by Arguing Publishing Merger Would Harm Top Authors

Antitrust is having a moment. From both the left and the right, politicians clamor for new tools and enforcement to maintain a spirit of competition in the U.S. economy. While many focus on Big Tech, one of the Biden administration’s first big swings in a more aggressive antitrust enforcement regime took aim at a decidedly un-techy industry: book publishing. In a sealed ruling issued on Oct. 31, a federal judge sided with the government and blocked the merger of Penguin Random House and Simon & Schuster. While the country’s attention was focused on the midterm elections, Judge Florence Pan unsealed…

Senate Antitrust Leader, AOC Slam Ticketmaster Amid Taylor Swift Concert Snafu

Ticketmaster is under fire from the Senate’s top antitrust legislator for appearing to abuse its monopolistic position over the ticket market in the wake of the platform’s snafu when Taylor Swift concert tickets went on sale this week. On Wednesday, Senate Competition Policy, Antitrust, and Consumer Rights Subcommittee Chair Amy Klobuchar (D-Minnesota) sent a letter to Ticketmaster CEO Michael Rapino, saying that the company appears to be abusing its grip over the market, which she said resembles a monopoly. In her letter, she cited issues that have plagued ticket buyers in recent years, like high fees that can almost equal…

House Lawmakers Say Amazon May Have Illegally Impeded Antitrust Investigation

On Wednesday, a bipartisan group of lawmakers in the House Judiciary Committee asked the Justice Department to probe whether or not Amazon illegally impeded the committee’s antitrust investigation into the company. During the committee’s 16-month long probe that ended in 2020, the company engaged in “potentially criminal conduct,” the representatives said in a letter to Attorney General Merrick Garland. That top Amazon executives lied to the committee suggests that the company was attempting to “influence, obstruct, or impede” the investigation, the committee continued. Throughout the investigation, “Amazon repeatedly endeavored to thwart the Committee’s efforts to uncover the truth about Amazon’s…