The US Saw Some of Its Worst Climate Disasters in 2022

The year 2022 will be remembered across the U.S. for its devastating flooding and storms — and also for its extreme heat waves and droughts. By October, the U.S. had already seen 15 disasters causing more than US$1 billion in damage each, well above the average. The year started and ended with widespread severe winter storms from Texas to Maine, affecting tens of million of people and causing… Source Source / Read More: The US Saw Some of Its Worst Climate Disasters in 2022

Climate-Related Cost-of-Living Increases Are a Harbinger of Future Crises

Climate conditions are putting upward pressure on global food prices, as people around the world chafe under levels of inflation not seen in decades. A prolonged drought this autumn is parching the Mississippi River watershed, pushing up the cost of producing key crops in the U.S. agricultural heartland. The lack of rain is not only hindering farm output, it’s also causing the Mississippi to slow to a trickle along parts of the massive waterway, which is burdening global supply chains by significantly slowing barge traffic critical to the global food system, a U.S. government report warned last week. “River levels…

US Has Cut Water Supplies for 7 States During Climate-Induced Drought

The federal government’s recent announcement that it would impose significant cutbacks in water allocations to the seven states reliant on water from the drought-stricken Colorado River is the latest sign that climate change is ravaging global water systems. Arizona will lose more than 20 percent of its water allocation, and Nevada 8 percent. Northern Mexico, which is also reliant on the Colorado River and has been provided 1.5 million acre feet of water per year from the river since a water-sharing treaty between the two countries was signed in 1944, is being hit hard as well, with a 7 percent…

“It’s Not a Drought, It’s Looting”: Water Rights Activists Organize in Mexico

Mexico is heading into the worst months of its dry season. Fifteen of 32 states are experiencing extremely high stress on water resources, as use surpasses the amount available. Water rights activists use the term “Day Zero” for the date when a region will lack sufficient water to meet basic needs. Much of Mexico is close to this point, with Monterrey and Nuevo Leon only having two months of water reserves, and Mexico City two years. For comparison’s sake, England has been described as being in the “jaws of death” because its Day Zero is 25 years away. Activists with…