Amnesty International's recommendations to states under review in UPR38 (May 2021)

This compilation of recommendations are made to seven of the states under review in the 38th session of the UN Universal Periodic Review (Belgium, Denmark, Mozambique, Paraguay, Sierra Leone, Singapore and Somalia) and address key human rights concerns in each country. Source / Read More: https://www.amnesty.org/en/documents/ior40/3940/2021/en/

UZBEKISTAN: ATTACKS ON BLOGGER MUST BE INVESTIGATED AND THE PERPETRATORS BROUGHT TO JUSTICE

Miraziz Bazarov, a blogger from Uzbekistan, was severely beaten by unidentified masked people in Tashkent, the capital of Uzbekistan, on 28 March 2021. Prior to the attack Bazarov had criticised current government policies in his Telegram channel and TikTok account, including the authorities’ refusal to decriminalise consensual sexual relations between men. Amnesty International calls on the government of Uzbekistan to investigate both the physical and the online homophobic attacks on the blogger and to prosecute those responsible. Source / Read More: https://www.amnesty.org/en/documents/eur62/3938/2021/en/

Six months after US import block against FGV, still no remediation for forced labor

For immediate release Washington, D.C.— On March 31, 2021, the Fair Labor Association (FLA) released its second report on “Findings on the Progress of FGV’s Action Plan 2020.” The Fair Labor Association is affiliated with FGV Holdings Berhad in order to monitor the company’s progress on addressing labor rights and exploitation, including forced labor. Based on this latest update from FLA, it is clear that FGV has been slow to implement meaningful reforms to improve labor conditions for workers on palm plantations and has strikingly failed to establish a remediation procedure for cases of forced labor — the very issue…

Côte d’Ivoire: ICC confirmation of Gbagbo and Blé Goudé acquittal another disappointment for victims of post-election violence 

Following today’s International Criminal Court (ICC) decision confirming the acquittal of Laurent Gbagbo and Charles Blé Goudé, Michèle Eken, Amnesty International West Africa Researcher said: “Victims of the 2010-2011 post-election violence in Côte d’Ivoire will be disappointed again today as the ICC’s Appeals Chamber confirms the acquittal of Gbagbo and Blé Goudé, meaning the court has held no one responsible for atrocity crimes committed during this period. “In parallel, the 6 August 2018 Ordinance adopted by President Ouattara granted amnesty to 800 people accused of or convicted of crimes related to the 2010-2011 crisis or subsequent crimes against state security.…

Council of Europe takes decisive action to combat torture tools trade

The Council of Europe (CoE) has today taken a vital step towards stemming the trade in torture tools and execution equipment, Amnesty International and the Omega Research Foundation said, as they called on all CoE member states to live up to commitments made today.   The CoE Committee of Ministers adopted a formal Recommendation which provides a framework for states to better regulate the trade in goods which could be used for “capital punishment, torture or other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment”. The Committee of Ministers is the CoE’s decision-making body, composed of government representatives of 47 member states.   “We…

Afghanistan: 'We survived the virus, but may not survive the hunger': The impact of COVID-19 on Afghanistan's internally displaced

Afghanistan’s four million of internally displaced people (IDPs) were already living in dire conditions when the COVID-19 pandemic hit globally, and the overcrowded IDPs camps were soon identified as places that demands urgent action by the authorities. With limited resources available, and considering the large number of people in camps, adequate help never arrived. But the lockdowns and other COVID-19 regulations meant that finding livelihoods more difficult, creating food insecurities within the camps, in addition to lack of water, sanitation and healthcare. This Campaign Digest discusses how the IDPs in Afghanistan are struggling with lack of information, access to PCR…

ประเทศไทย: หนังสือถึงสำนักงานคณะกรรมการกฤษฎีกา เรื่องร่างพระราชบัญญัติว่าด้วยการดำเนินงานขององค์กรไม่แสวงหาราได้หรือกำไรมาแบ่งปันกัน

แอมเนสตี้ อินเตอร์เนชั่นแนลพิจารณาว่าบทบัญญัติหลายประการของร่างพระราชบัญญัติจำกัดสิทธิเสรีภาพในการสมาคมและสิทธิมนุษยชนอื่น หากร่างพระราชบัญญัติฉบับปัจจุบันผ่านการพิจารณาโดยรัฐสภาและนำมาบังคับใช้ องค์กรที่ไม่แสวงหาผลกำไรและสมาชิกไม่เพียงต้องเผชิญกับมาตรการที่จำกัดเสรีภาพในการสมาคมที่เกินขอบเขตเท่านั้น แต่พวกเขายังต้องเผชิญกับการแทรกแซงสิทธิความเป็นส่วนตัวและเสรีภาพในการแสดงความคิดเห็นอันมิชอบด้วยกฎหมายโดยรัฐบาล แอมเนสตี้ อินเตอร์เนชั่นแนลพิจารณาว่าร่างพระราชบัญญัติไม่สอดคล้องกับพันธกรณีของประเทศไทยภายใต้กฎหมายและมาตรฐานด้านสิทธิมนุษยชนระหว่างประเทศ องค์กรเรียกร้องให้รัฐบาลไทยถอดถอนร่างกฎหมายทันทีและยืนยันพันธกรณีด้านสิทธิมนุษยชนในการปกป้อง ส่งเสริม และปฏิบัติตามสิทธิในการสมาคมและสิทธิอื่น Source / Read More: https://www.amnesty.org/en/documents/asa39/3928/2021/th/

Afghanistan: Country’s four million internally displaced need urgent support amid pandemic

The Afghan government and the international community must urgently scale up efforts to support the country’s four million internally displaced people (IDPs), who have been left badly exposed throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, said Amnesty International in a new briefing published today. The briefing, “We survived the virus, but may not survive the hunger”: The impact of COVID-19 on Afghanistan’s internally displaced, details how the pandemic has made an already dire situation for IDPs even more precarious. Living in overcrowded conditions, with insufficient access to water, sanitation, and health facilities, IDPs have little or no means of protecting themselves from contracting,…

Acting against state-imposed forced labor

Freedom United’s Executive Director, Joanna Ewart-James, spoke at the UN Global Compact Network U.K.’s Business & Human Rights Summit 2021 where she explored how some forced labor systems are organized by governments, embedding forced labor into our economic systems and creating a dependency on exploitation. Systems of state-imposed forced labor mean businesses can’t just rely on governments to respect human rights – businesses themselves must interrogate their supply chains and take responsibility for rights abuses. If you missed the event, you can read Joanna Ewart-James’ presentation below.   A lot of people think of modern slavery as distinct from historical…

Belarus: Older people impacted by state repression

The Belarusian authorities have endangered the health of older protesters who are at higher risk from COVID-19 by transporting them in overcrowded police buses and incarcerating them in packed prison cells, Amnesty International said today. In a new briefing, the organization documented the arrest and ill treatment of dozens of older people who took part in peaceful protests, including one 83-year-old man who was made to stand facing a wall for 90 minutes with his arms raised. “People of all ages have taken part in protests against the increasingly repressive regime of Alyaksandr Lukashenka. And irrespective of age, the Belarusian…

“I am a feminist, I am teacher, and I am a survivor advocate of human trafficking”

Writing for Global Citizen, Freedom United board member Sophie Otiende shares why centering lived experience in the anti-modern slavery movement is crucial to identifying sustainable solutions and achieving meaningful justice. Sophie Otiende works with Liberty Shared to offer a victim case management system and in her new role on the board of directors at the Global Fund to End Modern Slavery, Otiende will continue her work to ensure lived experience is prioritized in a sector heavily led by experts without personal experience – unlike many other social movements. Otiende’s expertise informed Freedom United’s My Story, My Dignity campaign calling on…

Christof Heyns: A tribute to a giant of human rights

This weekend, respected human rights lawyer Professor Christof Heyns passed away, aged 62.   Most recently, Professor Heyns was the was the Director of the Institute for International and Comparative Law in Africa at the University of Pretoria, and had also served as United Nations Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions from 2010 to 2016.  In his distinguished career, Professor Heyns worked closely with and inspired Amnesty International staff and volunteers around the world. Here, his friends and colleagues pay tribute to a giant of global human rights. Dr. Agnès Callamard, Secretary General of Amnesty International, said: “Christof Heyns…

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