Students Sue Yale for Pressuring Those With Mental Health Needs to Withdraw

A group of current and former Yale students is suing the Ivy League university over what they say is “systemic discrimination” against students struggling with mental health issues. In a lawsuit filed last week, they say school administrators routinely pressure students to withdraw from Yale rather than accommodating their mental health needs, a practice that disproportionately hurts students of… Source Source / Read More: Students Sue Yale for Pressuring Those With Mental Health Needs to Withdraw

Zimbabwe: Conviction of author Tsitsi Dangarembga and Barnes for protesting economic hardship a travesty of justice

Responding to news that Zimbabwean author and activist Tsitsi Dangarembga and fellow protester Julie Barnes were each convicted for “inciting violence”, handed a six-month suspended sentence for participating on the 31 July 2020 protest against economic hardship, and fined, Lucia Masuka, Executive Director of Amnesty International Zimbabwe, said: “The conviction of Tsitsi Dangarembga and Julie […] The post Zimbabwe: Conviction of author Tsitsi Dangarembga and Barnes for protesting economic hardship a travesty of justice appeared first on Amnesty International.

“Mental Health Units” in Prison Are Solitary by Another Name, Activists Say

Christian Hill has been diagnosed with borderline personality disorder and major depressive disorder. In the New York State prison system, this classifies him as having a serious mental illness and confers a “1-S” designation upon him. Under the newly implemented HALT Solitary Confinement Act, people with this mental health designation cannot be punished by being placed in the Special Housing Unit, or SHU, where they would spend at least 17 days alone in their cells. Instead, Hill and others with this designation must be sent to a Residential Mental Health Unit, a prison unit for incarcerated people with serious mental…

Gun Lobby Intervened Against a Republican’s Gun Law. Then He Lost His Seat.

This article was first published by ProPublica. ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for The Big Story newsletter to receive stories like this one in your inbox. Cole Wist was a Republican state House member in Colorado with an A grade from the NRA. Then, in 2018, he supported a red flag law, sponsoring a bill to allow guns to be taken away — temporarily — from people who pose an immediate threat to themselves or others. Wist lost his seat in the legislature that year in the face of an intense backlash from Rocky Mountain Gun…

“Dry” Month Campaigns May Reinforce Harmful Stereotypes About Substance Use

Campaigns that challenge people to abstain from alcohol for one month — often in support of a good cause — have emerged across the globe over the past decade. Dry January officially launched in 2013 with a public health campaign by British charity Alcohol Change. Other “month of abstinence” campaigns have included Dry July, Sober September, Sober October and “Dry February” — a few examples of campaigns from Australia, New Zealand, the United States, Canada and beyond. Dry campaigns have gained traction with people increasingly taking a time out from drinking alcohol for one month. Early research suggests alcohol use…

Amid Staffing and Mental Health Crises, Teachers Say Test Prep Is Wrong Priority

This article was first published at Labor Notes. In mid-October six fights broke out in one day at Lawrence High School in Massachusetts. Police were called and arrests made. For those inside the school, this was shocking, but not surprising. “The unrest is the students’ way of screaming out, ‘We need help,’” said high school English teacher Kristin Colucci. “Their social and emotional needs are not being met.” Since the return to school buildings in September, teachers and students say the stress and fragility are palpable. Lawrence High is so understaffed that sometimes students show up to a classroom and…

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