South Carolina Shows Abortion Rights Activists Can Make Progress in Red States

In a surprising development last week, the South Carolina Supreme Court stopped the state from enforcing a law banning abortion after the sixth week of pregnancy. That law was enacted in 2021 in the run-up to the U.S. Supreme Court’s Dobbs decision which overturned Roe v. Wade. Proponents of the law expected that in a post-Roe world it would end abortion in South Carolina. But the 2021 law mysteriously included a provision that its enactment “must not be construed to repeal, by implication or otherwise, Section 44-41-20 [(the codification of Roe)] or any otherwise applicable provision of South Carolina law…

Starbucks Union Scores First Unanimous Win in the South

Starbucks workers have voted unanimously to unionize at a South Carolina store, marking the union’s second win in the least unionized state in the country. The Starbucks location in Anderson, South Carolina, voted 18 to 0 to unionize, marking the union’s first unanimous win in the South, according to Starbucks Workers United. The store was the third to file for a union petition in the state, citing grievances regarding pay and poor working conditions. “[A]s it stands currently, corporate is severely out of touch with what goes on inside our cafe,” the workers wrote in their letter to Starbucks CEO…

Meadows, Who Pushed Right-Wing Myths of Voter Fraud, Registered in 3 States

Mark Meadows, who served as chief of staff under former President Donald Trump — and who has repeatedly spread lies about nonexistent widespread voter fraud — was registered to vote in three different states up until last week. According to reporting from The Washington Post, Meadows was registered to vote in Virginia, South Carolina, and North Carolina until last week, when North Carolina officials decided to remove him from the voter rolls. Meadows was on all three states’ voter rolls at the same time for a period of at least three weeks. The decision to remove Meadows’s registration status from…

South Carolina Lawmakers Propose Fines or Prison Time for Asking Vaccine Status

A bill proposed by the South Carolina state legislature would make it a crime for employers or business owners — and possibly even state residents in general — to ask someone if they have been vaccinated for protection against COVID-19. The lead sponsor of the bill, Republican Rep. Mike Burns, defended the proposal by claiming that it would protect state residents’ privacy rights. “Your private health information is still your private health information,” Burns said to a local news affiliate in the state, adding that he is opposed to private companies imposing vaccine rules for their workers. “We have a…

Translate »