Earth, Climate.

The overwhelming consensus amongst scientists is that climate change and global warming is caused by humans; that it’s having a damaging affect on weather patterns, accelerating extinction of wildlife, negatively impacting on agriculture, water supply, sea level, air quality. If we don’t radically change our diets, our fuel supply, the way capitalism recklessly plunders the world’s dwindling resources, we will enter a period of global food shortages, mass migration and conflict.

  • MPs urge Rishi Sunak to attend biodiversity summit in Canada
    Tory backbenchers are among 40 parliamentarians who asked PM to ‘stand up for nature’ at talksUK politics live – latest news updatesForty parliamentarians, including seven Conservative MPs, have privately written to Rishi Sunak imploring him to attend the Cop15 biodiversity conference, which starts next week.In the letter, seen by the Guardian and organised by the…
  • Up to 3,000 ‘peak polluters’ given last chance to close by Dutch government
    State attempts to push through plans to shut hundreds of farms to cut nitrogen oxide emissionsThe Dutch government is offering to buy out up to 3,000 “peak polluter” farms and major industrial polluters in an attempt to reduce ammonia and nitrogen oxide emissions that are illegal under EU law.The nitrogen minister, Christianne van der Wal,…
  • Revealed: more than 70% of English water industry is in foreign ownership
    Guardian unpicks complex web of investment firms, wealth funds and tax haven-based businesses that own most of sectorEngland’s water: the world’s piggy bankCan global water investors be held to account?England’s water: is privatised model a fair system?England’s water firms respond to investigation into role of global investorsForeign investment firms, private equity, pension funds and businesses…
  • ‘You’ll have to talk to the UK staff’: can global water investors be held to account?
    Will Malaysia’s YTL, US-based BlackRock and Hong Kong’s CK Hutchison Holdings answer questions about environmental damage?Revealed: more than 70% of English water industry is in foreign ownershipEngland’s water: the world’s piggy bankEngland’s water: is privatised model a fair system?England’s water firms respond to investigation into role of global investorsMost Malaysians know the YTL Corporation. Take…
  • The days of the hydrogen car are already over
    The days of the hydrogen car are already over Hydrogen fuel cell cars emerged as an alternative to both the electric and combustion engine vehicle in the early 2000s. They were widely considered an avenue towards universal green motoring. Powered through a chemical reaction between hydrogen and oxygen, the only tailpipe emission they produce is…
  • Hawaii’s Mauna Loa volcano erupts – in pictures
    The world’s largest active volcano has erupted for the first time in nearly 40 years on the Big island of HawaiiMauna Loa is erupting. What do you need to know? Continue reading… Source – Full Article Hawaii’s Mauna Loa volcano erupts – in pictures
  • Sizewell C ‘confirmed’ again – this time it might be the real deal | Nils Pratley
    Buying out China’s stake was inevitable but the government still has the onerous task of finding committed investorsAnother day, another “confirmation” that the government plans to build the Sizewell C nuclear power plant in Suffolk – surely the “most announced” project in UK infrastructure history. The latest update, though, contained a genuine sign of seriousness:…
  • Heat pumps without home insulation could raise bills and overload the grid – here’s what the government can do
    Heat pumps without home insulation could raise bills and overload the grid – here’s what the government can do Infrared imaging reveals where most heat is lost from a house. Ivan Smuk/Shutterstock The UK aims to replace 1.7 million gas boilers a year by the mid-2030s, as part of its plan to reach net zero.…
  • Waste pickers risk their lives to stop plastic pollution – now they could help shape global recycling policies
    Waste pickers risk their lives to stop plastic pollution – now they could help shape global recycling policies International waste pickers and allies visiting a sorting plant in Montevideo, Uruguay. Patrick O'Hare, Author provided Globally, waste pickers are responsible for collecting and recovering – from homes, businesses and landfills – up to 60% of all…
  • Big polluters given almost €100bn in free carbon permits by EU
    Free allowances ‘in direct contradiction with the polluter pays principle’, WWF report saysBig polluting industries have been given almost €100bn (£86bn) in free carbon permits by the EU in the last nine years, according to an analysis by the WWF. The free allowances are “in direct contradiction with the polluter pays principle”, the group said.Free…
  • U-turn on onshore windfarms likely after Tory rebellion
    Culture secretary says potential ‘tweaks’ to levelling up bill will be considered because of MPs’ concernsUK politics live – latest news updatesMinisters will make an announcement on a ban on onshore windfarms in the coming days, including potential “tweaks” to the levelling up bill, in the face of a growing rebellion by Conservative MPs.The culture…
  • Here are some crucial issues we’re covering in 2023 – with your help | Betsy Reed
    The new Guardian US editor sets out some of our key priorities for 2023, including abortion rights, the climate crisis and investigations into the powers shaping American lifeThis Giving Tuesday, please consider a year-end gift to the Guardian to support our journalism in the coming yearOn election night this November, the Guardian’s reporters fanned out…
  • Our US$10 trillion global energy bill dwarfs what’s needed to limit global heating
    Our US$10 trillion global energy bill dwarfs what’s needed to limit global heating William Potter / shutterstock The world’s energy bill for 2022 is set to be the highest ever, topping US$10 trillion (£8.3 trillion). This is the total price paid for all forms of energy across all sectors by all people. Something like 80%…
  • Mussels are disappearing from the Thames and growing smaller – and it’s partly because the river is cleaner
    Mussels are disappearing from the Thames and growing smaller – and it’s partly because the river is cleaner The population of River Thames freshwater mussels has declined by almost 95% since 1964. BadPixma/Shutterstock Freshwater ecosystems, including rivers, are home to 10% of all known animal species. Yet at the same time, they are losing their…
  • Tories will not reach ‘embarrassingly poor’ nature targets by 2030, Labour says
    Opposition to unveil plan to reverse biodiversity loss rather than simply halting it, which is government’s current targetThe government will not be able to achieve its nature targets by 2030, even though they are “embarrassingly poor”, the shadow environment minister and leading wildlife groups have said.Next week at the Cop15 biodiversity conference in Montreal, Alex…
  • Great Barrier Reef should be placed on world heritage ‘in danger’ list, UN-backed report says
    Experts from Unesco and IUCN find climate change threatens reef’s values and work to improve water quality is too slowGet our morning and afternoon news emails, free app or daily news podcastA UN-backed mission to the Great Barrier Reef has concluded the world’s biggest coral reef system should be placed on a list of world…
  • Rowan Williams urges wealthy to stump up cash for climate fund
    Former archbishop of Canterbury says richest nations and individuals must take lead on ‘loss and damage’Rich countries and wealthy individuals must urgently consider how to come up with the cash needed to help poor countries afflicted by climate disaster, the former archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams has said.At the Cop27 UN climate summit in Egypt,…
  • Go less frequently, stay longer: how I learned to embrace slow travel
    The antithesis of whistle-stop world tours, single-destination holidays offer sustenance and sustainabilityGet our weekend culture and lifestyle emailI came late to a love of travel. A combination of early marriage, child rearing and a focus on my own front yard were to blame for the delay. But I recovered from all three and started to…
  • Who will foot the bill for global climate disasters?
    Developing countries had a win at this year’s international climate summit Cop27, with developed countries agreeing to chip in to a fund to cover loss and damage from climate disasters. Jane Lee speaks to environment and climate editor Adam Morton and Vanuatu’s climate change minister Ralph Regenvanu about what this means for countries vulnerable to…
  • ‘We need a breakthrough deal on biodiversity’: can Montreal summit deliver for nature?
    In 201o, politicians pledged to halt devastation of Earth’s wildlife. Since then, no progress has been made. And despite glimmers of hope, prospects look grim for next month’s top-level meeting in Canada In 2010, politicians and scientists made a pledge to halt the devastating reductions in wildlife numbers that had been denuding the planet of…
  • Melting point: could ‘cloud brightening’ slow the thawing of the Arctic?
    The climate emergency is prompting some scientists to suggest extreme measures. But whether you call it geoengineering or biomimicry, others feel interfering with nature will have too high a costLike the apocryphal frog that doesn’t notice the rising water temperature until it’s boiled alive, we as a global society are still struggling to recognise that…
  • Disaster fatigue: how nine floods in six months have taken a toll on a NSW farming community
    Demand for mental health services has risen in the northern NSW town of GunnedahFollow our Australia news live blog for the latest updatesSign up for the Rural Network email newsletterJoin the Rural Network group on Facebook to be part of the communityIt’s the day after the ninth flood in six months in the New South…
  • Ragged leaves, untidy corners and no pesticides: how to plant a butterfly garden
    A butterfly-friendly back yard is not neat, but what is lost in nibbled leaves is made up for in fluttering colours, and an aid to conservationGet our weekend culture and lifestyle emailThe Richmond birdwing is a show-stopping butterfly. Males are black and dazzling green; females are black and white with a flashy gold trim. They…
  • The Christmas show must go on: householders vow to keep the festive lights on
    Soaring energy bills and cost of living crisis won’t deter yuletide light show enthusiasts but councils cut backAvril and Christopher Rowlands planted a tree in their front garden in 1978 after bringing it home on the roof rack of their white Mini. Now, the £6 tree is a 50ft high local landmark in their village…
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