Today's News

Why EFF Supports Repeal of Qualified Immunity

Our digital rights are only as strong as our power to enforce them. But when we sue government officials for violating our digital rights, they often get away with it because of a dangerous legal doctrine called “qualified immunity.” Do you think you have a First Amendment right to use your cell phone to record on-duty police officers, or to use your social media account to criticize politicians? Do you think you have a Fourth Amendment right to privacy in the content of your personal emails? Courts often protect these rights. But some judges invoke qualified immunity to avoid affirmatively…

Eruption at La Soufrière

Explosive activity has propelled ash and gas high into the air over the Caribbean islands of Saint Vincent and Barbados. Read More… Source: Read More: Eruption at La Soufrière

After Cookies, Ad Tech Wants to Use Your Email to Track You Everywhere

Cookies are dying, and the tracking industry is scrambling to replace them. Google has proposed Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC), TURTLEDOVE, and other bird-themed tech that would have browsers do some of the behavioral profiling that third-party trackers do today. But a coalition of independent surveillance advertisers has a different plan. Instead of stuffing more tracking tech into the browser (which they don’t control), they’d like to use more stable identifiers, like email addresses, to identify and track users across their devices. There are several proposals from ad tech providers to preserve “addressable media” (read: individualized surveillance advertising) after cookies…

Seroja Slams Australia

The category three cyclone made a rare landfall in Western Australia, causing significant damage to coastal towns. Read More… Source: Read More: Seroja Slams Australia

Will summer slow the spread of COVID-19? New research sheds light

MaxyM/Shutterstock At face value, it seems highly plausible that SARS-CoV-2 – the virus that causes COVID-19 – could behave seasonally, being more prevalent in winter and less so in summer. The four other coronaviruses that commonly circulate in humans behave in this way. We’ve also seen COVID-19 cases, hospitalisations and deaths spike over winter in the UK and other countries, which is suggestive of a seasonal effect. Some association between viral transmission and the seasons is to be expected. Many human behaviours are seasonal. In summer, we spend more time outdoors, where risk of infection is much lower, and we…

Will summer slow the spread of COVID-19? New research sheds light

Will summer slow the spread of COVID-19? New research sheds light MaxyM/Shutterstock At face value, it seems highly plausible that SARS-CoV-2 – the virus that causes COVID-19 – could behave seasonally, being more prevalent in winter and less so in summer. The four other coronaviruses that commonly circulate in humans behave in this way. We’ve also seen COVID-19 cases, hospitalisations and deaths spike over winter in the UK and other countries, which is suggestive of a seasonal effect. Some association between viral transmission and the seasons is to be expected. Many human behaviours are seasonal. In summer, we spend more…

Will summer slow the spread of COVID-19? New research sheds light

MaxyM/Shutterstock At face value, it seems highly plausible that SARS-CoV-2 – the virus that causes COVID-19 – could behave seasonally, being more prevalent in winter and less so in summer. The four other coronaviruses that commonly circulate in humans behave in this way. We’ve also seen COVID-19 cases, hospitalisations and deaths spike over winter in the UK and other countries, which is suggestive of a seasonal effect. Some association between viral transmission and the seasons is to be expected. Many human behaviours are seasonal. In summer, we spend more time outdoors, where risk of infection is much lower, and we…

Polluting SUVs will be on roads for the next two decades – what should we do with them?

Polluting SUVs will be on roads for the next two decades – what should we do with them? Alexfan32/Shutterstock The biggest source of air pollution in UK cities is traffic, and in a new report, researchers discovered that a major contributor to the problem is the popularity of unnecessarily large and fuel-hungry cars. Known disparagingly as “Chelsea tractors”, sport utility vehicles – more commonly known as SUVs – are highly polluting. Petrol and diesel SUVs produce 25% more CO₂ on average than a medium-sized car and, since 2017, they’ve outsold fully electric vehicles in the UK at a rate of…

We studied the DNA of African and Asian leopards and found big differences between the two

African leopard. Ben Goodheart, Author provided Leopards are among the most widespread carnivores today, living in a wide range of habitats, from deserts to rainforests, and from the lowland plains to the mountainous highlands. Over the past century, they’ve experienced extreme habitat losses due to human activity, both directly from hunting and indirectly from habitat reduction and prey competition. This has led to the land they occupy being reduced by over 50% in Africa, and over 80% in Asia, involving the local extinction of many populations. Genetic analysis of leopards is important to understand their population history, structure and dynamics.…

Scientists Completed the First Human Trial of a Wireless High-Bandwidth Brain-Computer Interface

Scientists Completed the First Human Trial of a Wireless High-Bandwidth Brain-Computer Interface Brain-computer interface technology is advancing rapidly, but it currently relies on wires that seriously limits its use in everyday applications. That could soon change, though, as researchers recently completed the first human trial of a high-bandwidth wireless neural interface. The most accurate way to record brain signals today is by using a device called an intracortical brain-computer interface (BCI), which involves an array of electrodes being implanted into a patient’s motor cortex. Signals from these electrodes then pass to a port in their skull, which connects to cables…

Have introverts really fared better in lockdown?

MR.Yanukit/Shutterstock Since the onset of the pandemic, everyone from newspaper columnists to Twitter users has advanced the now idea that extroverts and introverts are handling the crisis differently. Many claim that introverts adapt to social distancing and isolation better than extroverts, with some even suggesting that introverts are practically “loving” the crisis, as it offers them a rare chance to play to their strengths. According to personality theories, extroversion-introversion constitutes one of the fundamental psychological axes along which people differ. Extroverts typically exhibit higher levels of energy and sociability compared to introverts, enjoying a boost in mood after social interactions.…

Female Micro-Entrepreneurs and Social Networks: Diagnostic Analysis of the Influence of Social-Media Marketing Strategies on Brand Financial Performance

The business world is facing a very complicated situation due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Small- and medium-sized companies (SMEs)—both in Spain and at the global level—are seeing their survival jeopardized by a fall in revenues. This scenario is aggravated in the case of micro-SMEs headed by female entrepreneurs. Accordingly, micro-SMEs, particularly those led by female entrepreneurs, need to reinvent themselves to overcome the current adversities that could lead to the destruction of their businesses and hence their jobs. One of the ways to do this is to take advantage of digital transformation. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to…