Earth

  • Green Harvest in South Korean Waters
    Seaweed farms are a common sight in the shallow waters along the Korean Peninsula’s southern coast. Read More… Source: Read More: Green Harvest in South Korean Waters
  • Tracking an Antarctic Iceberg’s Epic Journey
    The long voyage of one of the planet’s largest bergs—A-68A—has come to an end. Read More… Source: Read More: Tracking an Antarctic Iceberg’s Epic Journey
  • Satellites highlight a 30-year rise in ocean acidification
    Oceans play a vital role in taking the heat out of climate change, but at a cost. New research supported by ESA and using different satellite measurements of various aspects of seawater along with measurements from ships has revealed how our ocean waters have become more acidic over the last three decades – and this…
  • Fine-Tuning Irrigation in Asia
    Scientists harness satellite data to help farmers use less water in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Read More… Source: Read More: Fine-Tuning Irrigation in Asia
  • ESA and FAO unite to tackle food security and more
    With ESA positioned as a world-class provider of Earth observation data and the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) leading international efforts to defeat hunger, the two organisations have teamed up to exploit their particular fields of expertise to better address major global issues such as food security, and to take further advantage of…
  • Surigae Stirs Up the Pacific
    The super typhoon reached extreme intensity earlier in the year than any storm in the satellite era. Read More… Source: Read More: Surigae Stirs Up the Pacific
  • Winners presented with ESA-EGU Excellence award
    The winners of the first ESA-EGU Excellence Award were awarded their prizes earlier today at the virtual EGU General Assembly ceremony, attended by ESA’s Director General, Josef Aschbacher and ESA’s Acting Director of Earth Observation Programmes, Toni Tolker-Nielsen. Read Full article: https://www.esa.int/Applications/Observing_the_Earth/Winners_presented_with_ESA-EGU_Excellence_award
  • Celebrate Earth Day with ESA
    At ESA, every day is Earth Day. As we humans continue to subject our home planet to increasing pressures, we are better placed than ever to understand and monitor the consequences of what we inflict. Astronauts onboard the International Space Station give us the human perspective of how beautiful Earth is, while satellites orbiting above…
  • Sea Ice Highs and Lows
    There were no records set in 2020-21, but the downward trends in polar ice continue. Read More… Source: Read More: Sea Ice Highs and Lows
  • Winter is Long in Orenburg
    Snow cover highlights the details of this railroad hub and city at the south end of the Ural Mountains. Read More… Source: Read More: Winter is Long in Orenburg
  • India’s White Desert
    The Rann of Kutch can appear drastically different depending on the time of year. Read More… Source: Read More: India’s White Desert
  • La Soufrière volcano: before-and-after
    Image: False-colour images captured by Copernicus Sentinel-2 show the aftermath of the explosive volcanic eruption that took place on 9 April 2021 on the Caribbean island of Saint Vincent. Read Full article: https://www.esa.int/ESA_Multimedia/Images/2021/04/La_Soufriere_volcano_before-and-after
  • Earth from Space: Space Coast, Florida
    On 22 April 2021, on Earth Day, Thomas Pesquet is planned to return to the International Space Station for his second mission, Alpha. Ahead of his launch, the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Cape Canaveral, USA, in a region known as the Space Coast. Read Full article: https://www.esa.int/Applications/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_Space_Coast_Florida
  • Tracking La Soufrière’s Plume
    Explosive eruptions from the Caribbean volcano have flung ash and sulfate particles to the stratosphere. Read More… Source: Read More: Tracking La Soufrière’s Plume
  • Satellite imagery key to powering Google Earth
    One of the most comprehensive pictures of our changing planet is now available to the public. Thanks to the close collaboration between Google Earth, ESA, the European Commission, NASA and the US Geological Survey, 24 million satellite photos from the past 37 years have been embedded into a new layer of Google Earth – creating…
  • A Fierce Fire Season in Nepal
    After an unusually dry winter, forest fires have raged throughout the mountainous country. Read More… Source: Read More: A Fierce Fire Season in Nepal
  • Eruption at La Soufrière
    Explosive activity has propelled ash and gas high into the air over the Caribbean islands of Saint Vincent and Barbados. Read More… Source: Read More: Eruption at La Soufrière
  • Seroja Slams Australia
    The category three cyclone made a rare landfall in Western Australia, causing significant damage to coastal towns. Read More… Source: Read More: Seroja Slams Australia
  • Hiding in Plain Sight
    Springtime ocean conditions promote North Atlantic blooms, but you wouldn’t know that from looking with human eyes. Read More… Source: Read More: Hiding in Plain Sight
  • Western Lake Trio
    An astronaut captured this view of three basins—Tahoe, Walker, and Mono—straddling two different climates. Read More… Source: Read More: Western Lake Trio
  • Venezuela’s Sandy Peninsula
    The Paraguaná Peninsula is rich with sandy beaches and interesting topography. Read More… Source: Read More: Venezuela’s Sandy Peninsula
  • Earth from Space: Bucharest, Romania
    The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Bucharest – the capital and largest city of Romania. Read Full article: https://www.esa.int/Applications/Observing_the_Earth/Earth_from_Space_Bucharest_Romania
  • Preparing for Rising Seas in the Maldives
    A new artificial island near Malé could be a destination for people trying to escape rising waters on lower-lying islands. Read More… Source: Read More: Preparing for Rising Seas in the Maldives
  • Satellites monitor Mount Etna’s unpredictable behaviour
    Italy’s Mount Etna, Europe’s most active volcano, has recently been on explosive form, with 17 eruptions in less than three months. Instruments onboard three different satellites orbiting Earth have acquired imagery of the eruptions – revealing the intensity of the lava-fountaining eruptive episodes, known as paroxysms. Read Full article: https://www.esa.int/Applications/Observing_the_Earth/Satellites_monitor_Mount_Etna_s_unpredictable_behaviour

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