Technology

  • Advocates and diplomats agree: Uyghur issue threatens U.N. credibility
    This past week, world leaders have assembled at the United Nations (U.N.) in New York for the annual opening of the General Assembly. While some diplomats have taken to the […] The post Advocates and diplomats agree: Uyghur issue threatens U.N. credibility appeared first on FreedomUnited.org.
  • Why parents shouldn’t be saddled with environmental guilt for having children
    Much of the debate regarding the environmental cost of childbearing is underpinned by one influential study. Given the global commitment to net zero, should this be revisited?
  • 700 metres of rubbish: farmers grapple with choked rivers amid Australia’s third La Niña
    Graziers and farmers along the Macquarie River say flooding used to be beneficial but has become ‘far worse and goes for far longer’ than it shouldSign up for the Rural Network email newsletterJoin the Rural Network group on Facebook to be part of the communityWhen the first floods swept through Kate Mildner’s drought-stricken farm in February 2020, she described it as “beautiful”. But then the rain just didn’t stop.With 80% of her 4,400-hectare property now underwater and a disaster declared in the Warren Shire, it’s a genuine case of “one extreme to the other”, she says.Sign up to receive Guardian…
  • Droughts, heat and fire: the future of wine in the climate crisis
    Across the planet, growers are having to adjust to extreme conditions in a warming worldThere’s a worryingly valedictory tone to many of the conversations I have with winemakers these days. Time and again, I’m told that it’s impossible, in many if not most years, to make the wines in the style they used to make. Crop-destroying weather events that were considered extreme just a decade ago are now to be expected. Each year that passes brings them closer to the point where they will no longer be able to make wine in their vineyards at all.The cause, of course, is…
  • Are you ready to take action on climate and cost of living?
    Following the postponement of the Festival of Resistance last weekend, we can now confirm that we will come together on October 14-16 for a long weekend of action, outreach, performances, talks and trainings. More on this to come!  The post Are you ready to take action on climate and cost of living? appeared first on Extinction Rebellion UK.
  • Grieving for a grandparent: a counsellor explains how they help people through such a loss
    William Prince of Wales and Catherine Princess of Wales accompanied by Harry, Duke of Sussex and Meghan Duchess of Sussex look at tributes to Queen Elizabeth II outside Windsor Castle Alamy/ Jamie Lorriman Many of us feel touched by the loss of our queen, but that is nothing compared to the loss of a beloved…
  • Should we really believe scientific facts will last forever when history is full of revolutions in thinking?
    Phrenology has long since been overturned, but it was once very popular among scientists. Holly Anne Cromer/Shutterstock Astronomers once believed the Sun revolved around the Earth. In the 19th century, scientists thought the shape of a person’s skull could reveal their mental strengths or weaknesses. And in the 20th century, many scientists fiercely opposed the…
  • How parents’ internet addiction can fuel their children’s – and what to do about it
    CarlosDavid/Shutterstock Teenagers are often accused of being addicted to their mobile devices, but new research shows they’re often just modelling their parents’ behaviour. Of course, we all use digital devices for work, for fun, and for socialising – but too much screen time can be harmful. There is such a thing as “digital addiction” and…
  • Curious Kids: what is exotic matter, and could we use it to make wormholes?
    Rost9/Shutterstock What is exotic matter, and could we use it to make wormholes? – Julia, aged 14, London Matter is “stuff”. It is anything that is made up of particles that take up space. Everything we can feel and see on Earth is matter, and it’s usually in one of three types: solid, liquid or…
  • Ultra-processed foods: it’s not just their low nutritional value that’s a concern
    Many everyday food products are ultra-processed. Jiri Hera/ Shutterstock In countries such as the UK, US and Canada, ultra-processed foods now account for 50% or more of calories consumed. This is concerning, given that these foods have been linked to a number of different health conditions, including a greater risk of obesity and various chronic…
  • How fake science websites hijack our trust in experts to misinform and confuse
    Fake science websites are dressing up their content as verified and authoritative. M_Agency/Shutterstock The scientific method is rigorous. Claims and premises are supported with evidence. The peer review system is designed to ensure that research is scrutinised by experts before publication. And whenever researchers lack certainty, they’ll emphasise that “further research is necessary” to land…
  • Migrant domestic workers trafficked and abused in Oman
    A new report has exposed how women from Sierra Leone have been trafficked into domestic work in Oman and trapped in abusive private households while the authorities fail to protect […] The post Migrant domestic workers trafficked and abused in Oman appeared first on FreedomUnited.org.
  • How massive stars steal planets – new research
    There could be a planetary heist going on in the star-forming region NGC 3324 in the Carina Nebula. NASA/James Webb Telescope Our Sun has a rather lonely existence in the Milky Way galaxy. It sits on its own, four light years away from the nearest star, with only its planetary system for company. But it…
  • Seven times people discovered the Americas – and how they got there
    The Vikings got to the Americas long before Columbus. vlastas/Shutterstock When Columbus landed in 1492, the Americas had been settled for tens of thousands of years. He wasn’t the first person to discover the continent. Instead, his discovery was the last of many discoveries. In all, people found the Americas at least seven different times.…
  • Radiocarbon dating only works half the time – we may have found the solution
    A new DNA method could help making it easier to date skeletons Malinka333/Shutterstock Dating is everything in archaeology. Exciting discoveries of ancient burial sites or jewellery might make headlines, but for scientists, this kind of discovery is only meaningful if we can tell how old the artefacts are. So when chemist Willard Libby developed radiocarbon…
  • Psychedelic drugs can be almost as life altering as near-death experiences
    Psychedelic trips and near-death experiences share some common features sezer66/Shutterstock Occasionally, people who suffer intense turmoil and trauma undergo a profound change. They feel a new sense of wellbeing, purpose and appreciation of life. Their relationships become more authentic and intimate. They feel as if they’ve woken up and are living in a more intense…
  • Pregnancy in space: studying stem cells in zero gravity may determine whether it’s safe
    Weightlessness affects how our cells develop and divide. MarcelClemens/Shutterstock Space is a hostile, extreme environment. It’s only a matter of time before ordinary people are exposed to this environment, either by engaging in space tourism or by joining self-sustaining colonies far away from Earth. To this end, there needs to be a much better understanding…
  • Four ways to tell if your cat loves you – based on science
    Nitiphonphat/Shutterstock Even the most devoted cat owners wonder at some point, perhaps waking up in a cold sweat in the middle of the night, whether their cat really loves them. Dog people like to smugly point out dogs’ long history as humankind’s best friend. But research shows cats’ reputation as a cold and aloof pet…
  • VAR: I used motion capture technology to show why the Premier League gets tight offside decisions wrong
    Pooya Soltani, Author provided In a recent Premier League game, Manchester United went 2-0 up when striker Marcus Rashford ran on to a pass and slotted the ball past Liverpool’s goalkeeper, Alisson Becker. The game was then held up briefly while the “video referee” checked whether Rashford was ahead of the last defender, Joe Gomez,…
  • Frank Drake has passed away but his equation for alien intelligence is more important than ever
    The spiral galaxy M74 imaged by the NASA/ESA JWST. ESA/Webb, NASA & CSA, J. Lee and the PHANGS-JWST Team., CC BY-NC-ND How many intelligent civilisations should there be in our galaxy right now? In 1961, the US astrophysicist Frank Drake, who passed away on September 2 at the age of 92, came up with an…
  • Eats, hops and breeds: New Zealand’s worsening wallaby plague
    A skilled hunter can shoot 100 of the invasive marsupials in a night. But with millions of hectares infested, some fear control efforts are too latePete Peeti flicks off the headlights, cuts the ignition and lets his truck roll quietly down a bush track, deep in the heart of New Zealand’s North Island. Twilight is slipping into night and rain is falling in thick drapes. “Close your door quietly when you get out,” Peeti says. He slings his gun over his shoulder and scans the track with high-tech thermal vision goggles. “The hardier ones will brave the rain,” he says…
  • Imagining a world beyond borders
    Borders no longer exist only along the confines of a territory – they are now embedded in our societies, rearing their head every time a medical professional checks a patient’s […] The post Imagining a world beyond borders appeared first on FreedomUnited.org.
  • Five ways the metaverse could be revolutionary for people with disabilities
    Frame Stock Footage The invention of the world wide web in 1989 eventually brought about life-changing tools for everyone who can access it. Some of these tools, such as online banking, shopping and communication, have vastly improved the accessibility of daily life for people with disabilities, as well as older people. The concept of virtual…
  • Could neurotechnology make lawyers smarter workers?
    Barristers may be set to swap their wigs for electroencephalograms. DC Studio/Shutterstock Cognitively enhanced lawyers may one day work in our courts. A recent report from The Law Society of England and Wales suggests the rapidly advancing field of neural technology could create “digitally enhanced” super-lawyers capable of focusing more keenly or accessing case law…
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