Our Strength Lies in Our Humanity

Everything is Connected

There are times in our lives when it’s easy to forget how connected everything is. Times when life gets a little too tough and stressful and we end up paying more attention to our own well being in a way that disregards the cost and the consequences to the world out there; the people, the environment and everything else that’s a part of it. We find ourselves being selfish – not because we want to be but because circumstances force us to be.

That’s how the world got into the state that it’s in now. Here’s a neat 20 minute video that explains it all.

On this website I’ll be exploring and adding videos and articles that help to expand and explain the rich and diverse complexity of the world we live in – complex but not complicated.


Latest News

Can AI Rescue Modern Medicine From Itself?

Can AI Rescue Modern Medicine From Itself? Labor unions have been around since the mid-19th century, and they’ve helped many a teacher, government employee, electrical worker, and others gain fairer pay or better working conditions. Unions give workers a chance to dictate their own terms and present a united front, ideally leaving everyone better off…

The mysterious ‘Tully Monster’ fossil just got more mysterious

The mysterious ‘Tully Monster’ fossil just got more mysterious Artist's impression of _Tullimonstrum_. PaleoEquii/Wikipedia, CC BY-SA Every now and again, scientists discover fossils that are so bizarre they defy classification, their body plans unlike any other living animals or plants. Tullimonstrum (also known as the Tully Monster), a 300m-year-old fossil discovered in the Mazon Creek…

Drug experts on the new guidance for medicinal cannabis

Drug experts on the new guidance for medicinal cannabis shutterstock/Canna Obscura It’s now one year since the government announced they would allow access to cannabis-based products for medicinal use, and guidelines advising doctors how to prescribe have now been published. Opening up access to medicinal cannabis was welcomed by many as a bold policy move,…

Why Designing Our Own Biology Will Be the Next Big Thing in Medicine

Why Designing Our Own Biology Will Be the Next Big Thing in Medicine It’s hard to watch a loved one get sick. Their eyes go glassy. Their breathing is punctuated by body-wracking coughs. Feverish and aching, they struggle to get out of bed. Hard as these symptoms are to witness, they’re so familiar you don’t…

3D Printing Rockets in Outer Space? This Company’s Going For It

3D Printing Rockets in Outer Space? This Company’s Going For It There’s a startup in California with dreams of enhancing the future of space travel, and they have their very own Stargate. Not the teleportation portal from science fiction, of course. The Stargate owned by Relativity Space, which just announced a new funding round of $140 million in October, is arguably the largest metal 3D printing device in the world.…

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How small states can cut their carbon emissions to net zero – Wales has already started

How small states can cut their carbon emissions to net zero – Wales has already started Richard Whitcombe/Shutterstock Efforts to tackle climate change often focus on international agreements and the actions of large countries such as the US and China. But most of the world’s countries or autonomous states have fewer than 10m people. What happens in small states is critical to the world’s transition to low-carbon energy. This isn’t…

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Men over 40 with faulty BRCA2 gene should be tested annually for prostate cancer

Men over 40 with faulty BRCA2 gene should be tested annually for prostate cancer Jarun Ontakrai/Shutterstock Scientists at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, are calling for annual blood tests to detect aggressive prostate cancer in men who have a fault in the BRCA2 gene. After researching the effectiveness of the test, Ros Eeles, who led the study, said: “Our research shows very clearly that men with the BRCA2 gene…

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The human body never truly disappears – finding the remnants of a tragic end can help us uncover atrocities

The human body never truly disappears – finding the remnants of a tragic end can help us uncover atrocities EsHanPhot/Shutterstock The dead are never really gone. In archaeology and the forensic sciences, that’s quite literally true. Though people tend to think that mortal remains quickly turn to nothing, in reality, the human body is very resilient and can persist for hundreds and even thousands of years. Most people will have…

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How you experience the menopause may have a lot to do with your family

How you experience the menopause may have a lot to do with your family A group of related women farming. Credit: Yuping Yang, Author provided The menopause happens around the age of 50, and for many women, the end of their fertile life is accompanied by uncomfortable symptoms, such as hot flashes, night sweats and anxiety. In the West, it is generally taken as read that these symptoms are a…

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Sky News London | Royal Courts of Justice

In a judgment handed down on Wednesday morning, Mr Justice Dingemans and Mr Justice Chamberlain said the section 14 order imposed during XR’s ‘autumn uprising’ in October was unlawful. The post Sky News London | Royal Courts of Justice appeared first on Extinction Rebellion. Source: https://rebellion.earth/2019/11/06/sky-news-royal-courts-of-justice/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=sky-news-royal-courts-of-justice

Extinction Rebellion wins landmark legal challenge to Met Police ban on peaceful protest

Email: press@risingup.org.uk; Phone: +44(0)7969 083371  Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Media Assets | Legal Crowd Funder  | What emergency? | Extinction Rebellion in Numbers |This Is Not A Drill: An Extinction Rebellion Handbook. #EverybodyNow  #ExtinctionRebellion The High Court rules the Metropolitan Police’s blanket ban of Extinction Rebellion protests was unlawful  The landmark judgment upholds the peoples’ fundamental right to peaceful protest and prohibits the Police from any such future…

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SMART discovers breakthrough way to look at the surface of nanoparticles

SMART discovers breakthrough way to look at the surface of nanoparticles Singapore (SPX) Nov 06, 2019 Researchers from SMART, MIT’s research enterprise in Singapore, have made a groundbreaking discovery that allows scientists to ‘look’ at the surface density of dispersed nanoparticles. This revolutionary technique enables researchers to ‘characterise’ or understand the properties of nanoparticles without disturbing the nanoparticle, and also at a far lower cost and far quicker too. The…

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Newsletter 31 – A Season of Change

(Sign up to the International Newsletter here) There’s change in the air. This change takes many shapes. Indians can see it with their eyes and feel it with their lungs. For many others, from Romania to indigenous land in Brazil it appears as an absence: of trees, of food, of loved ones. Sri Lanka.  It can be for the better as well as the worse: the UK government has put a hold on fracking, while our story on XR Austria (below) is enough to fill the weariest rebels with hope. Change is coming for all of us – even world leaders have felt the effects of the turmoil in Chile, with COP25 dramatically relocated to Madrid. (We wish XR Spain luck with this sudden twist! If you’re in Europe and willing to help, see here.) Chile. Following October, many…

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Even mild hearing loss as a child can have long-term effects on how the brain processes sound

Even mild hearing loss as a child can have long-term effects on how the brain processes sound Africa Studio/ Shutterstock, Author provided When we are born, our brains have a lot to learn. For the newborn baby, everything they learn about the world around them comes from their senses. Therefore, if a child’s brain is deprived of sensory information, it will continue to develop, but in a different way. A good example of this comes from children who are born deaf. Research has shown that adults who have been deaf since birth show changes in the way their brains process sensory information. Parts of the brain that would normally process sounds (the so-called auditory cortex) are also activated by visual stimuli, for example. However, we also know that timing is…

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Everything You Need to Know About Superstar CRISPR Prime Editing

Everything You Need to Know About Superstar CRISPR Prime Editing All right, let’s do this one last time. My name is CRISPR. I was made from a bacterial defense system, and for years I’ve been the one and only gene editing wunderkind. I’m pretty sure you know the rest. I’m relatively cheap to make, easy to wield, and snip out genes pretty on target. I’m going into clinical trials. I’m reviving the entire field of gene therapy. There’s only one CRISPR. And you’re looking at it. Well, just as Spider-Man was way off, so is the idea of a single CRISPR to rule them all. This month, Dr. David Liu at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard in Cambridge, MA, introduced an upgrade that in theory may correct nearly…

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Labour’s low-carbon ‘warm homes for all’ could revolutionise social housing – experts

Labour’s low-carbon ‘warm homes for all’ could revolutionise social housing – experts A home designed to Passivhaus standards, with solar panels and windows that help conserve heat. Radovan1/Shutterstock All homes built from 2022 onwards would be carbon neutral under a Labour government, according to a recent election pledge by the party. Labour has also promised to guarantee “warm homes for all”, by retrofitting the UK’s 27m houses with insulation, double-glazed windows, heat pumps and solar panels, to help them save and produce at least as much energy as they use, effectively neutralising their contribution to the climate crisis. At the moment, that contribution is surprisingly large – heating and energy use in homes accounts for 18% of the UK’s total carbon emissions. Decarbonising housing is an urgent task and will…

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Electric planes are here – but they won’t solve flying’s CO2 problem

Electric planes are here – but they won’t solve flying’s CO2 problem Eviation's Alice prototype. Ian Langsdon/EPA The UK government plans to ban the sale of new conventional petrol and diesel cars by 2040. Clearly the plan is for all citizens to be driving electric or hybrid-electric cars, or – better still – riding bicycles. But can electrification help cut emissions from that other carbon-intensive form of passenger transport, flying? This is a complex question and one where size matters. It is possible for small aircraft to be powered by electricity. In fact several companies are already developing small electric aircraft and they could come on the market within the next few years. But for the large aircraft we all use more frequently it is unlikely to happen anytime soon.…

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